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Old 05-28-2014, 08:23 PM   #1
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Default Frogs and Toads 2014

I believe there used to be a frog thread, though I think it was in amongst water gardening threads. I have been taking a plethora of frog photos in the past few weeks and thought other folks might be, too. Frogs are very photogenic!
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Old 05-29-2014, 07:28 AM   #2
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Thank you turttle. I love your pictures. I have not seen a toad in years. I hope that is because my habitat provides them with so many places to hide. I have a new frog in my water garden. It is a small frog. It sounds like it is screaming when it makes a sound. So far I haven't been able to get a picture. It peeks out from under the slate. After it rains on warm days the frogs really sing. I love to listen to them. I bet turttle gets to hear all kinds of critters with that big pond.
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Old 05-29-2014, 09:00 AM   #3
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Could it be a Fowler's Toad. They make a very unmusical bleat. This year they bred one night, but then the weather has been going back and forth between warm and humid, and cold and damp, and they haven't been in the pond again. I do have a lot of tadpoles in the pond, but I am wondering what has become of the adult toads. Earlier this week during a warm spell there was one bleating, but no more eggs in the pond. When tadpoles get big enough they will eat the strings of toad eggs. I didn't know this until last summer when I watched large tadpoles (about to sprout legs) eating strands of eggs the way I go through spaghetti in white clam sauce.
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Old 05-29-2014, 06:35 PM   #4
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I got things a little confused. What I have in the water garden is a green frog. I went on the internet and listened to frog and toad sounds. And I do have Fowler's toads around my property(thanks for the tip Arey). I never see them. When I hear them over at the neighbors I panic because they kill frogs and toads. I tell them to bring them to my property. They don't like them because they get in their pool.
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:14 PM   #5
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Ellen, try the Davidson College herp website for your herp identification needs. You are north of NC and so the species list won't be entirely the same but I am sure there is broad overlap, and the photos are great and there are sound clips of the calls that are very useful for identification.

Try going out at night with a flashlight when you hear the toads calling, and look along the water's edge. That is where I most often see them, though I also find them in my pond skimmer on occasion and emerging from sand and compost piles in the spring when they come out of hibernation. At the moment I have hundreds of thousands of toadlets everywhere, I have to watch where I step. Most of them will get eaten and disappear within a few weeks and there will be fewer, larger ones.

Amphibians and Reptiles of North Carolina - Davidson Herpetology Laboratory
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Old 05-31-2014, 03:26 PM   #6
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That's a great website. Thank you turttle. I am very jealous of all your frogs and toads. Your place must sound fantastic at night.
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Old 06-01-2014, 08:27 PM   #7
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Cacophonous would be the word to describe my yard between late February when the American toads start in through the first frost when the last of the katydids and cicadas give up the ghost and go silent. I love identifying the frogs and toads by their calls, and going out with a flashlight to find them. If you have water on your property, I am sure you can find them, too.

I wouldn't think bullfrogs would be particularly intelligent, but mine have figured out that I am not a threat and I can now walk around the pond and they just sit there undisturbed. Earlier in the spring I would hear the "plop! plop!" of frogs jumping into the water in panic but never see them, so it is nice that they have acclimated. It is harder to get photos of the little ones, the chorus frogs and tree frogs.
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Old 06-02-2014, 08:07 AM   #8
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Why is it easier to see the frogs at night? Are they more active at night?
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Old 06-03-2014, 04:17 PM   #9
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Many of the species are nocturnal. They are easiest to find when they are calling and you can echo locate on them, and in my experience that is easiest at night with a flashlight while they are calling by the water. I sometimes see them just hopping around in the early evening, especially during or just after a rain, in my perennial garden or along the edges of the stream.
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:16 PM   #10
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Sounds good. I will give it a try. I am hearing Fowler's toads a lot even during the day. I really hear them after it rains. thanks
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