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Old 03-10-2009, 06:30 PM   #1
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Default Experts work to combat deadly amphibian fungus

Experts work to combat deadly amphibian fungus
The Associated Press
Published: February 20, 2009

Experts work to combat deadly amphibian fungus - International Herald Tribune
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"This is not a natural extinction event," said Allan Pessier, a scientist from San Diego Conservation Research, which has been researching the spread of the chytrid fungus. "It is caused by humans, and it is our responsibility — almost our moral responsibility — to do something about it."... Thought to be caused by the exportation of amphibians from their natural habitats, the fungus is killing off amphibians at an accelerated rate, Pessier said... The problem started off slowly in the 1930s, when frogs were widely transported to other countries for medical purposes, food and pets, Pessier said.
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:16 AM   #2
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frog It's Not Easy Being Gene Suppressed

It's Not Easy Being Gene Suppressed
Released: 8/5/2009 12:00 PM EDT
Source: University of Idaho

It's Not Easy Being Gene Suppressed
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Newswise — Frogs around the world are dying from a fungal pathogen perhaps because they don't realize they are sick.

In a study conducted at the University of Idaho, scientists found that the immune system of the study's frog species failed to respond to the chytrid fungus known as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In fact, it appears the fungal infection may actually suppress its victim's immune system.
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"The biggest thing we found was a surprising lack of response by the frogs," said Erica Bree Rosenblum...
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:17 AM   #3
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Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis to Infection with the Deadly Chytrid Fungus
PLoS ONE: Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis to Infection with the Deadly Chytrid Fungus
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Old 12-15-2009, 03:27 PM   #4
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Default Outdoors: Disease dwindles amphibian count

Outdoors: Disease dwindles amphibian count
Published: Tuesday, December 8, 2009
By Jeffrey L. Frischkorn

Outdoors: Disease dwindles amphibian count - The News-Herald Sports : Breaking news coverage for Northern Ohio
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Spring may be growing quieter as a worldwide pandemic fungal disease is killing off entire populations of amphibians: frogs, toads, salamanders and similar creatures.

And Northeast Ohio is not immune from the chytridiomycosisfungus, either...
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Old 12-13-2010, 05:11 PM   #5
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CHYTRID FUNGUS, FROGS - WORLDWIDE: POSSIBLE RECOVERY

Date: 11 Dec 2010
Source: Ethiopian Review [edited]
http://www.ethiopianreview.com/news/201002/?p=15518

Quote:
Frogs in Australia and the United States may be recovering from a fungal disease that has decimated amphibian populations around the
world, researchers say.

Between 1990 and 1998, the populations of several frog species in Australia plummeted due to chytridiomycosis infection, but a recent survey suggests the frogs are re-establishing themselves, NewScientist.com http://www.newscientist.com/ reported Friday [10 Dec 2010]. "It's happening across a number of species," Michael Mahony at the University of Newcastle in New South Wales says.

Barred river frogs, the tusked frog and several tree frog species have returned to areas where they had almost disappeared, and some
species have even reached pre-infection levels, Australian researchers say. There are also signs of recovery in the United States.

Roland Knapp at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory of the University of California says mountain yellow-legged frogs, once
"driven virtually to extinction," are returning. The big question is, are frogs now beating the fungal infection?

Knapp and Mahony have separately determined that recovering frogs are living with low-level infections of the fungus. It is possible, they
say, the fungus has weakened in the areas where frogs are recovering. There is also evidence the frogs are evolving, Knapp says.

At Vanderbilt University, researchers found a population of Australian green-eyed tree frogs previously decimated by the fungus produced more antimicrobial peptides, which inhibit fungal growth, on their skin than a less affected population.

"It's quite likely that populations are adapting and developing better defenses," Vanderbilt researcher Louise Rollins-Smith says.
This is good news for all of us and for the frogs. Let us hope the recovery of many species continues. We might wonder whether the
fungus is getting weaker, or perhaps there has been an adaptation to overcome the fungus, and how much damage is being done to the
individuals living with a low level of the fungus. There are likely many more questions that remain unanswered.

There are some species that have already been wiped out and are now classified as extinct. Let us hope this is truly a recovery.
Photos of the Giant Barred River frog may be found at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pokerch...el/3378697238/

Photos of the Southern Mountain Yellow Legged frog may be found at:
http://animal.discovery.com/tv/vanishing-frogs/top-5/mountain-yellow-legged-frog.html

Photos of Green-eyed Tree Frogs may be found at:
http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/green-eyed-tree-frog/
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Old 12-13-2010, 06:41 PM   #6
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Knapp and Mahony have separately determined that recovering frogs are living with low-level infections of the fungus. It is possible, they say, the fungus has weakened in the areas where frogs are recovering. There is also evidence the frogs are evolving, Knapp says.
Evolving??? That would have been a remarkably quick adaptation, perhaps reminiscent of the darkened color of moths in England in response to the building darkening pollution of the Industrial Revolution. Some small population of frogs must have already had the protective quality and became favored by the attack of the fungus, perhaps?
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:53 AM   #7
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[quote=jack;84208]Knapp and Mahony have separately determined that recovering frogs are
living with low-level infections of the fungus. It is possible, they
say, the fungus has weakened in the areas where frogs are recovering.
There is also evidence the frogs are evolving, Knapp says.

Quote:
Some small population of frogs must have already had the protective quality and became favored by the attack of the fungus, perhaps?
That seems a more reasonable explanation to me as well.
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