Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Miscellaneous Gardening Boards > Help Identifying Plants

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-20-2011, 06:23 PM   #11
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
Well, if it's the sole host to an entire species, it must have a pretty decent survival rate. Good luck with it.
I did a little research--what did we do before we had all of this info at our fingertips!?!

Looks like we are well within its native range. Yippee!

Here is a list of its host plants:

Caterpillar hosts: Plants where eggs are laid and that caterpillars eat before hibernating are turtlehead (Chelone glabra), hairy beardtongue (Penstemon hirsutus), English plantain (Plantago lanceolata), and false foxglove (Aureolaria). After overwintering, caterpillars may continue to use these plants, but may also wander and feed on unrelated plants including arrowwood (Viburnum recognitum), common lousewort (Pedicularis canadensis), Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), and white ash (Fraxinus americana).

Butterflies and Skippers of North America - Euphydryas phaeton
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 12:19 AM   #12
Grub
 
Runmede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Virginia
Default

Second year host plant for Baltimore Checkerspots:
Viburnum recognitum - Smooth Arrowwood (N)
Viburnum dentatum - Southern Arrowwood (N)
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus - Coralberry, Indian Currant, (N)
Lonicera xylosteum - European Fly-Honeysuckle (I)
Lonicera japonica - Japanese Honeysuckle (I)
Lonicera canadensis - Fly-Honeysuckle (N)
Fraxinus americana - White Ash (N)
Verbesina alternifolia - Yellow Ironweed (N)
Solidago spp. – Goldenrod (N)
Valerianella radiata - Beaked Corn-salad (I)
Plantago lanceolata - English Plantain, Buckhorn, Ripple, Ribgrass (I)
Veronica spp. – Speedwell (N)
Scrophularia marilandica - Carpenter's Square, Maryland Figwort (N)
Penstemon hirsutus - Hairy Beard-tongue (N)
Pedicularis canadensis - Common Lousewort, Wood Betony (N)
Mimulus ringens - Square-Stemmed Monkeyflower (N)
Chelone glabra - Turtlehead (N)
Aureolaria pedicularia - Fern-leaved False Foxglove (N)
Aureolaria flava (N)
Fringe Tree (N)
Trumpet Honeysuckle (N), Moth Mullein (I), Skullcap (N), Butterfly Bush (I), Joe Pye Weed (N) , Lilac (I), Blue Vervain (N)

I = Invasive non-native
N = Native
__________________
"Man should be good stewards of nature."
Runmede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 07:42 AM   #13
Fox
 
Bulucanagria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S. Grafton, Massachusetts
Default

Color me educated!
__________________
BULUCANAGRIA'S FLICKR
Bulucanagria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 05:17 PM   #14
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Great list, Runmede. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runmede View Post
Second year host plant...
I'm not familiar with the term second year host plant... could you explain? Are these nectar sources for the adult butterfly?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runmede View Post
...Moth Mullein (N)
FYI, I don't think moth mullein is native to the U.S.

__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 07:40 PM   #15
Grub
 
Runmede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Virginia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Great list, Runmede. Thanks.
I'm not familiar with the term second year host plant... could you explain? Are these nectar sources for the adult butterfly?
FYI, I don't think moth mullein is native to the U.S.
The Baltimore Checkerspot goes into diapause as a caterpillar in its first year. Then, it winters over as a caterpillar in the first to third instar. In the spring of the next year, it emerges in April and continues its cycle. In this second year, it has a long list of secondary host plants.

You are right the Moth Mullein is an invasive plant. I edited the listing.
__________________
"Man should be good stewards of nature."
Runmede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 08:16 PM   #16
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runmede View Post
The Baltimore Checkerspot goes into diapause as a caterpillar in its first year. Then, it winters over as a caterpillar in the first to third instar. In the spring of the next year, it emerges in April and continues its cycle. In this second year, it has a long list of secondary host plants.
Thank you for the explanation. How interesting; I'd never heard of that, but then again, I've got a lot to learn on a lot of subjects.

So, in their first year, are they restricted to only the one host plant?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runmede View Post
You are right the Moth Mullein is an invasive plant. I edited the listing.
I remember thinking how attractive moth mullein was in my teens (as well as other things I assumed were native wildflowers) and wanting to include it in my planned meadow. Early on, I just remember wanting to grow more than a mowed, Chemlawn-treated grass. My father was always interested in organics and was not big on herbicides and pesticides, so we were never Chemlawn customers. As I learned that *some* of what I assumed were wildflowers were not natives, I began to want to recreate a solely native habitat.

I realize not everyone is as strict in what they plant as I am, but I try to avoid confusion for anyone searching for natives. I hope no one ever minds me pointing that out...or correcting me if I'm wrong.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2011, 01:19 AM   #17
Grub
 
Runmede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Virginia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Thank you for the explanation. How interesting; I'd never heard of that, but then again, I've got a lot to learn on a lot of subjects.
So, in their first year, are they restricted to only the one host plant?
I remember thinking how attractive moth mullein was in my teens (as well as other things I assumed were native wildflowers) and wanting to include it in my planned meadow. Early on, I just remember wanting to grow more than a mowed, Chemlawn-treated grass. My father was always interested in organics and was not big on herbicides and pesticides, so we were never Chemlawn customers. As I learned that *some* of what I assumed were wildflowers were not natives, I began to want to recreate a solely native habitat.
I realize not everyone is as strict in what they plant as I am, but I try to avoid confusion for anyone searching for natives. I hope no one ever minds me pointing that out...or correcting me if I'm wrong.
It depends on the state. In VA and Maryland, they only use the Chelone. In some New England states, MA and RI for example, they are actually using Chelone and an invasive plant, English Plantain. They will eat the English Plantain in the second year. In the mid west, I've heard about them laying on False Foxglove. You had posted this information:

Quote:
Caterpillar hosts: Plants where eggs are laid and that caterpillars eat before hibernating are turtlehead (Chelone glabra), hairy beardtongue (Penstemon hirsutus), English plantain (Plantago lanceolata), and false foxglove (Aureolaria). After overwintering, caterpillars may continue to use these plants, but may also wander and feed on unrelated plants including arrowwood (Viburnum recognitum), common lousewort (Pedicularis canadensis), Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), and white ash (Fraxinus americana).
Moth Mullein is a weed. It plants itself most of the time. My yard is full of weeds. Butterflies use many non-native plants as host plants, too.
__________________
"Man should be good stewards of nature."
Runmede is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
baaaack

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2