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Old 05-16-2010, 03:59 PM   #1
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Default Mystery Violet

So I bought a couple of violets. And one of them is doing something strange. I honestly don't recall it flowering ever, the white flower in the first picture is to another violet, Not the plant I need ID'd. So it started producing these berries up on top of the leaves, which is very strange for a violet. At first I though those were the flower but apparently they're seed pods.
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Mystery Violet-mysteryviolet.jpg   Mystery Violet-mysteryvioletseeds.jpg  
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Old 05-16-2010, 04:35 PM   #2
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Viola pubescens?
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Old 05-16-2010, 11:00 PM   #3
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I had the same one quite a few years ago.... They had a purple blossom when and if they bloomed. Mine too did the seed developing part without blooming quite often so I removed them (Like forever) and replanted the area with natives.....I still run into a few hiders every now and then. I like flower power and this one just didn't do it. It is a very good spreader though if that's what you want. It produces a ton of seed capsules that pop open when ripe dispersing the seeds all over. If I recall correctly.... they even had seed pods that developed underground. Sounds weird for a plant to be able to do something like that!
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Old 05-17-2010, 04:17 PM   #4
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I think that what you are seeing is the result of reproduction through cleistogamous flowers. This is quite common in some of the native violets.

Quote:
Cleistogamy or automatic self-pollination describes the trait of certain plants to propagate by using non-opening, self-pollinating flowers. Especially in peanuts, peas, and beans, this behaviour is most widespread in the grass family, though the largest genus of cleistogamous plants is actually Viola.
Cleistogamy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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Chasmogamous (CH) flowers are often large, showy, and attractive to pollinators. In contrast, cleistogamous (CL) flowers are very small and resemble buds that form directly into seed capsules. It is often thought that CH flowers are produced to attract insects and to facilitate outcrossing, while CL flowers are the "back-up plan" in case pollinators are scarce any particular year. However, Stewart (1994) has shown that CH flowers may actually be capable of self-pollination in some species. My research involves determining the factors involved in the production of CH/CL flowers and the genetic consequences of this mating system in violets.
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