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Old 05-06-2010, 10:57 PM   #1
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Default Found on rocks by a reservoir

I've looked but couldn't nail it down. I think it's a Rock Cress but which one? Or am I wrong about that? Grrr! Sometimes I could wish that I didn't want to know the names of everything!
Found on rocks by a reservoir-080ed.jpgFound on rocks by a reservoir-080ed2.jpg
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Old 05-07-2010, 12:56 AM   #2
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Arabis would have been one of my first thoughts too, but have a look at this one:
Houstonia* caerulea: UW-Stevens Point Freckmann Herbarium: Plant Details Page

The flowers are often white, the petals are pointed at the end, and the colored throat (and its pattern) seem to match. I looked for a better closeup of the flower to link to, but I didn't find anything as good as yours to compare with it.
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Old 05-07-2010, 05:40 AM   #3
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Why, I do believe you nailed it! Everything matches but I overlooked the possibility because apparently their most often blue but all the ones I saw were white. That was in two disparate locations miles apart. Given that, I'll have to excuse myself for assuming white was the predominant color and searching accordingly.
Thanks Cirsium! It's nice to add another native to my own personal plants database.
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Old 05-07-2010, 09:23 AM   #4
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Wow that is a beautiful flower.
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Old 05-07-2010, 04:22 PM   #5
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Yes, I've always loved bluets--that is what I grew up calling them...though I've heard "Quaker ladies", I had never seen them called innocence before opening the link. I recognized them immediately, but I must say, I've never seen them grow in such an amazing setting before. I'm always fascinated by rocks and the plants that can grow in such rugged thin soils and such. Thanks for the photo!
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Old 05-07-2010, 09:45 PM   #6
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It is a beauty, isn't it? Very simple, not showy like an orchid (not that there's anything ugly about an orchid). My Audubon Guide to New England refers to them as Bluets as well. I'm seeing a lot of them right now, in various habitats. I had to take these pictures to show this setting because, like you dapjwy, I'm amazed by how tenacious such seemingly fragile organisms can be.
I went to the same reservoir today and saw many more of them, although not in a similar setting. I saw and took pictures of a few other new (to me) flowers, while I was there. As we were walking out I said to my buddy, "Well, I didn't catch any fish, but I saw some really pretty flowers!" He said, "Good for you, Dan". I think he was being facetious.
You may end up seeing some of those flowers here in the ID forum if I exhaust all other avenues.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:20 PM   #7
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Quote:
You may end up seeing some of those flowers here in the ID forum if I exhaust all other avenues.
Now don't get too stingy with these ID requests, some people like a challenge you know. And everybody likes to see interesting plants!
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Old 05-07-2010, 11:20 PM   #8
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OK then, how about confirming my ID of one of today's finds. It even technically conforms to my original title if you consider that sand is just many, many tiny rocks! I have tentatively IDed this as Early Azalea (aka Hoary Azalea) (Rhododendron prinophyllum) or Pink Azalea (aka Pinxter plant) (R. Periclymenoides). I'm leaning towards the latter because a site I accessed claims that one of the distinguishing characteristics is that R. prinophyllum is a deeper shade of pink. Any ideas?

Found on rocks by a reservoir-.jpgFound on rocks by a reservoir-b.jpgFound on rocks by a reservoir-c.jpgFound on rocks by a reservoir-d.jpg
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Old 05-08-2010, 12:41 AM   #9
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Wow, I didnt realze Pinxterbloom azaleas grew that far north. I'm not familiar with R. prinophyllum, but I'm leaning towards the pinxter too,(pinxter is supposed to be old Dutch for Pentecost) azalea for the bloom time, and it looks fuzzy to me.

That's a tough one - they hybridize, too. I would have been there all day checking it out !

Native Azaleas - Pink Group
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:33 AM   #10
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I grabbed the R. prinophyllum ID from the Connecticut Botanical Society website and then got more info at Native Azaleas - Rhododendron prinophyllum. The differences between the two are somewhat subtle and their ranges and bloomtimes overlap. In fact, according to the above linked site, they were considered the same species until 1914. So, I'm not worried too much if I'm wrong. I'm going with Pinxter Plant...unless somebody else has somebody else has something to say. It's not like I'm committed or anything.
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azaleas, azure bluets, bluets, found, houstonia caerulea, innocence, native azaleas, native plants, photos, pinxster azalea, pinxster bloom azalea, plant id, plant identification, plant photos, quaker-ladies, reservoir, rocks

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