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Old 05-01-2009, 09:00 AM   #11
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I think the odds are seriously against this being the native (but it is possible, I guess).
The area this is located at has vines/roots literally crisscrossing all over the ground - a nasty-bit-o-business!
I'm constantly seeing youthful vines popping up everywhere back there. I also located a few trunks of the stuff (about 3 -4 " in diameter) - most I cut and painted lat year.

I would welcome the native - for sure.
Do you know of any pics online showing how to tell the native from the non?
I'm a visual girl. but in a pinch I can use my official terminology book :
Amazon.com: Plant Identification Terminology: An Illustrated Glossary (9780964022164): James G. Harris, Melinda Woolf Harris: Books

I don't like to destroy anything unless I know for sure what it is - no problem leaving it for a bit as there's plenty else to deal with over there.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:08 PM   #12
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I bought two for an arbor. I thought I was buying the native. I did not get the native and it took me a few years to figure it out yet I walked under that arbor almost daily. You plant something, you water it until it establishes, and if it seems ok you pay little attention to it after that. That's what I did. It wasn't until somebody came over and asked why the heck I was growing Wisteria sinensis that I really took a good look at what I was growing. Dumb dumb dumb dumb. Here is some help for you, PCA Alien Plant Working Group - Exotic Wisterias (Wisteria floribunda & sinensis) "Unlike American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens), native to the southeastern U.S., which flowers June through August, and produces a non-hairy seed pod 2-4 inches long, both exotic wisterias flower in the springtime (April-May) and produce a velvety seed pod. The fuzzy brown seed pods are 4-6 inches long, narrowed toward the base, with constrictions between the seeds. Stems of the exotic wisterias can grow to 15 inches in diameter in older plants. White-barked Japanese wisteria vines twine clockwise around the host plant and Chinese wisteria twines counter-clockwise. The compound leaves, consisting of 7-13 (Chinese) or 13-19 (Japanese) smaller leaf units, called leaflets, are about 1 foot long and alternate along the stem. Fragrant, violet to blue-violet flowers, to 1 inch long, occur in showy, pendulous clusters that hang gracefully from the twining stems." http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/470 "The stem of Japanese wisteria is white in comparison to the dark gray bark of Chinese wisteria. Its leaves are pinnately compound, 4 to 16 inches long arranged alternately on stems, containing 13 to 19 leaflets. Leaflets are ovate in shape with wavy margins. " Wisteria sinensis- Chinese wisteria and Wisteria floribunda- Japanese wisteria, "Both non-native Wisteria species resemble the native American wistera, Wisteria frutescens, but can be distinguished from it by their more aggressive habit, densely pubescent ovaries and fruits, and round-flattened seeds. Wisteria frutescens is not an aggressive grower and has glabrous fruits and more or less cylindrical, bean-shaped seeds." That should do you. I would wait it out until you know for sure what you have.
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Old 05-02-2009, 02:46 PM   #13
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Default some other wisteria in the area - not pretty

Quote:
White-barked Japanese wisteria vines twine clockwise around the host plant
I'd say this is clockwise, no?

2nd (norway maple) and 3rd (wisteria) photos show the bases of both.
looks like they are seriously trying to keep themselves anchored.
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Old 05-02-2009, 03:05 PM   #14
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I forgot to say thank you to equilibrium for doin' all my research for me -
thanks!

here's a photo of the wisteria vines inundating the area (along with other nasties - see 'em smirking at me?).
I think these indicate japanese wisteria as well.

and a photo of the original "mystery" plant today
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Old 05-02-2009, 06:32 PM   #15
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Default Wisteria floribunda, sinensis, frutescens

The vine you have is clockwise. Wisteria sinensis I can always nail because it twines counter-clockwise. Both Wisteria frutescens and W. floribunda twine clockwise. That was how a friend taught me to tell the difference between those two and... mine were not the nice native I thought I bought. Out they went. The seed pod of our native is always glabrous. Both Asian wisteria have hairy seed pods. That's a dead give away. It's May. I don't know that because your plant is blooming now is the give away. Too close to June and you are in southern NY. There are 13 leaflets on the plant you photographed which would be consistent with the Japanese and the American annd the Chinese for that matter. Flower clusters on the plant you photographed are definitely longer than 4" which is consistent with Asian Wisteria. I'd say the "smirking" is the dead give away BUT... you could always wait for a seed pod if you aren't comfortable wasting those smirkin nasties. If that's hairy with a round seed... you have a nasty. Want to save one from death long enough to take photos of the seed pods and seeds for everyone?
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Old 05-08-2009, 11:23 PM   #16
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Default update: about a week later....

no seed pods yet.
wanted to post some updated photos
all of the original plant
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Old 05-11-2009, 12:33 PM   #17
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Pretty plant. Too bad it's so invasive.
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Old 05-11-2009, 01:29 PM   #18
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Pretty plant and smells sooooo good. The one I planted at a previous house came from my woods, but don't know if it's a native or runaway invasive. I could get plenty of starts from that one, but focusing on food crops this year. I'm thrilled to know there are some native ones. And when I go over to visit (mom, not the plant), I can check if it has fuzzy seed pods or not.
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Old 08-09-2009, 02:00 PM   #19
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binoculars american vs. asian

some info I've gathered -
please let me know if anything seems incorrect...

chinese counter clockwise
japanese and american - clockwise.

both asian/exotic wisterias flower in the springtime (April-May) - before leaves. have fragrant flowers, and produce a velvety fuzzy seed pod 4-6 inches long, narrowed toward the base, with constrictions between the seeds

seed pod ~ Wisteria sinensis - Chinese wisteria
http://plants.usda.gov/gallery/pubs/wisi_005_pvp.jpg*

american: (southeast) The unscented flowers emerge in summer after the leaves. smooth, non-hairy seed pods 2 to 4 inches long

seed pod ~ American wisteria Wisteria frutescens
http://gardenblog.projo.com/08/wisteria_pods_560.jpg
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Old 08-09-2009, 02:24 PM   #20
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Thank you for the update bubbleoffplumb.
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