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Old 12-14-2014, 09:20 AM   #1
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Default Medicinal Herbs

Does anyone use herbs medicinally, or for bath/beauty?

I grow herbs, and just acquired a package of assorted dried herbs purchased by someone else - meaning I did not research and choose them myself for a particular purchase. I bought a couple of books, but I'm still stuck and not sure what to do next.

Just to start somewhere, I started Calendula oil, goldenseal oil, calendula tincture and golden seal tincture.

If anyone makes or uses herbs other than for cooking, I'd love to hear from you.
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Last edited by biigblueyes; 12-14-2014 at 09:21 AM. Reason: change herb to goldenseal
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Old 12-14-2014, 10:55 AM   #2
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I use a fly spray on my horses that has these ingredients in it:

Contains Cedarwood, Eucalyptus, Cajuput, Lemongrass, Pennyroyal and Peppermint oils

It seems to work pretty well.

I try to plant mint around my house foundation because it is supposed to repel insects like ants to keep them out of the house.

This is an interesting topic. I hope more people will post.
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Old 12-14-2014, 11:05 AM   #3
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I started taking Evening Primrose oil because it is supposed to help with hair loss for thyroid problems. I've read that is has several other possible benefits.
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Old 12-15-2014, 08:57 PM   #4
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I keep several boxes of herbal teas at my desk, and I alternate - a medicinal one, and then one that just tastes good. I've noticed that a lot of the flavored teas I buy have some of the same ingredients as the medicinal ones.
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Old 12-16-2014, 11:07 AM   #5
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Sometimes I have digestive problems. I read that ginger helps with that. Every evening I have a cup of ginger lemon tea. It's good do drink in the evening since it has no caffeine. It also tastes really good. Not an herb but I keep reading that lemon has health benefits. I'm going to stay in the habit of putting a wedge of lemon in my drinks. It makes any drink taste better.
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Old 12-17-2014, 08:02 PM   #6
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We might think of green things when we say "herbs", but lemon has medicinal properties.

From Web MD :

Quote:
Lemon is a plant. The fruit, juice, and peel are used to make medicine.

Lemon is used to treat scurvy, a condition caused by not having enough vitamin C. Lemon is also used for the common cold and flu, H1N1 (swine) flu, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), Meniere's disease, and kidney stones. It is also used to aid digestion, reduce pain and swelling (inflammation), improve the function of blood vessels, and increase urination to reduce fluid retention.
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Old 12-18-2014, 11:01 AM   #7
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I heard Dr. Oz talking about it on the radio. I use Wb MD alot. Had some green tea with fresh lemon in it yesterday. Delicious. I don't eat citrus fruit very often so putting lemon in my drinks helps me get the benefits of citrus fruit.
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Old 12-18-2014, 11:56 AM   #8
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Pine needles are also very high in vitamin C.

The Health Benefits of Pine Needle Tea | LIVESTRONG.COM

Edible Wild Food Recycle Your Christmas Tree ? Drink It!

Growing some American Ginseng from seed this year. On the downturn because of over harvesting and very rare now in the wild. Hoping to add to the genetic pool and return them back into the woods through the birds.


Also getting some Mad Dog Skullcap, which has proven to have an anxiolytic effect in rats. "In a small-scale double blind, placebo-controlled study, blue skullcap had anxiety-reducing effects in 19 volunteers."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutellaria_lateriflora
Overview?Flavonoids: A New Family of Benzodiazepine Receptor Ligands - Springer

Making your own oils and tinctures is fairly easy, and the plants to use are in our backyards. Knowing how much to use is the hard part. Exercise caution on which plants to use and how much as they can be poisonous.
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Old 12-18-2014, 02:45 PM   #9
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I looked up flavonoids and found this interesting.
flavonoids

Arizona Tea has Ginseng in it. Twice I have noticed when I drink the green tea with Ginseng on a regular basis I have lost weight.

Blue skullcap is a native plant. Interesting. I did not know about it's anti anxiety benefits.

Does anyone grow Arnica? It is a very hardy perennial that I have grown for years. My 89 year old father uses Arnica cream on a regular basis for his arthritis. I know other people who use it also.
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Old 12-19-2014, 01:27 AM   #10
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pawprint slippery elm is good for everything, on me at least hahaha

I do use slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) bark. I skin some bark off the tree branches for a snack. I peel off the outer grey/beige bark with a pocket knife, which reveals the white 'sap wood' or 'inner bark', that is the part I eat. I don't try to eat the red 'heart wood', because I'm just not that hungry! If you do take some inner bark from a tree trunk, go vertical with your shavings, there is no point in killing a perfectly good tree by girdling it horizontally all the way around, try to use the limbs if you can reach them.

Anyway the slippery elm bark (inner bark) can be peeled & dried in the air, for use later, and it is almost as good as fresh. You probably think it funny chewing the bark off a tree for a snack, and I'm pretty sure some squirrels laugh at me when I do it...but who cares what those little guys think is funny.

The best thing about slippery elm bark is that it is slippery, like you wouldn't believe! I think if you had an engine that runs on water, slippery elm bark would be the perfect water based lubricant. It immediately gets thick/but slippery in your mouth as you chew some thin shavings of the stuff. I try not to get hoggish about it and just eat 1 or 2 shavings at a time, if ya put 3 or 4 in there, goshhhh...you will be chewing for a while and you may not be able to swallow a big wad of the stuff (the more ya chew it, it seems to swell so much). So I just chew a small amount, and swallow the fiber, because the fiber as it goes thru your body...lol will be slippery all the way!


So I guess you could say it is a kind of laxative, that tastes great too! (well OK it doesn't really taste like much of anything, but it is tolerable)

You can use it to thicken soap, but it doesn't really add flavor, and you may have to pull the wood shavings out of the soup pot...just to keep visitors from saying: "DaNg...is this wood chips or something in here????"

Slippery elm bark is also used as a food preservative, but I don't have much experience with that yet.

As for medicine, first aid or something, if I got a wasp sting, I wouldn't hesitate to make a quick suave by chewing some slippery elm bark till totally wet & plaster that on there. (it sticks pretty well fibers & all when out in the air) I have given first aid to trees that have gotten injured in the woods as another tree skinned it when falling down, and plaster the good tree with some slippery elm plaster on the sore spot, works...till rain washes it off.

I've heard of people grinding/pounding their slippery elm bark into a dry powder, but I've never wanted to work that hard at it.

You've probably heard of the old song "a spoon full of sugar helps the medicine go down"...well slippery elm bark will help medicine go down FASTER! hahahaa just joking about that part, I couldn't recommend anything about any kind of medicine, good, bad, fast, or slow.

One note of caution about slippery elm, if your in the woods and you see an old slippery elm tree fallen laying on the ground and you might think your going to tight-rope walk that log. If it is dry as a bone then your OK, but if it is misty outside or raining, you will slide right off of it faster than you can say SLIPPPPPPPPERYYYYYYY ELM.

ww
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