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Old 08-18-2011, 03:31 PM   #1
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I find myself taking mostly close-ups...partly because these little vignettes show off my few scattered native plants that tend to get lost on our two acres. I sometimes crop out things that are not native or are not what I want the area to look like. I decided to start this thread to show what I'm really dealing with...most pictures will show the bigger picture, but I'm assuming I'll throw in some close-ups and then the larger picture to get a feel for the setting in which it grows.

Others should feel free to post their "big picture" shots here as well. I know linrose has sometimes showed distant shots of her property (beautiful shots, I might add). So, post away.

My photos to follow.
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:05 PM   #2
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The first shows what I'd normally share, the second includes what jack has been pestering me about (I mean prompting me ).
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Old 08-18-2011, 06:54 PM   #3
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The first shows what I'd normally share, the second includes what jack has been pestering me about (I mean prompting me ).
Ah, you ruined my harassment! I was just going to complement you on that NATIVE garden, especially that beautiful strange looking (perhaps alien) tree in the foreground!!!
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Old 08-18-2011, 08:34 PM   #4
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Ah, you ruined my harassment! I was just going to complement you on that NATIVE garden, especially that beautiful strange looking (perhaps alien) tree in the foreground!!!
Yippee, I ruined it! ...or did I?

...I think, somehow, you don't realize that my project is a work in progress. What I *add* to the property is native...the long, difficult process is removing the aliens and replacing them with something native and useful.

I'll be sure to post pictures of the demise of this not-so-beautiful "strange looking (perhaps alien) tree in the foreground" this winter or early spring. Until then, I guess I'll just have to endure your continued harassment.
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:49 PM   #5
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Yippee, I ruined it! ...or did I?

...I think, somehow, you don't realize that my project is a work in progress. What I *add* to the property is native...the long, difficult process is removing the aliens and replacing them with something native and useful.

I'll be sure to post pictures of the demise of this not-so-beautiful "strange looking (perhaps alien) tree in the foreground" this winter or early spring. Until then, I guess I'll just have to endure your continued harassment.
Okay, with that promise of its imminent demise, I'll let up on you. I was consumed with the idea of destroying that creature, and with your written assurance in this post, I now feel I have succeeded. But, I must admit, the endeavor was a lot of fun for me. It never had the feeling of being work.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:31 PM   #6
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That puny little thing should come down with a couple of whacks with an axe (or a minute with a bow saw). Let 'er rip! (She says with two JMs of her own).

More overall shots of the field, I don't remember where I was talking about field maintenance and bushhogging and when to mow, etc. so I'll show you what I'm talking about, the low area that stays wet into late spring. There's no way I can get my little Cub Cadet in there and mow down 7-8 foot tall ironweed, 6 foot tall goldenrod, pokeweed, and the occasional woody like sumac. It's been unmown for 3 years (I think) now and I'd probably seize the blade.

Here's the low field, and a little higher up the thicket gets more dense, finally in the upland where it is really dry, gray goldenrod is about to bloom. I think I'd have more luck mowing that than down below.
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Old 08-20-2011, 01:22 PM   #7
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Okay, with that promise of its imminent demise, I'll let up on you. I was consumed with the idea of destroying that creature, and with your written assurance in this post, I now feel I have succeeded.
I don't think this is the first time I've given written assurance....but, it is the first time you gave ME some!

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But, I must admit, the endeavor was a lot of fun for me. It never had the feeling of being work.
LOL! I'm sure you never broke a sweat.
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Old 08-20-2011, 01:49 PM   #8
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That puny little thing should come down with a couple of whacks with an axe (or a minute with a bow saw). Let 'er rip! (She says with two JMs of her own).
It is actually taller than me, but still will not be hard to take down. I plan on girdling it this winter, then decide what to do with it after that. I might leave it in place as a snag, but if that doesn't look right, I'll try trimming it down to make it look like an old snag, and if I don't like the results, out it goes.

I want to grow a blackgum and some shrubs in its place--possibly blueberry bushes, but I'm open to suggestions.


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More overall shots of the field...

Here's the low field, and a little higher up the thicket gets more dense, finally in the upland where it is really dry, gray goldenrod is about to bloom. I think I'd have more luck mowing that than down below.
Thanks for helping us get a better, bigger picture of what you have as well.

The field I mow is like your upland field. I can see how you'd have trouble down below. After getting it bush hogged, do you think you could mow down young ironweed early summer or dried ironweed early spring?
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Old 08-20-2011, 07:43 PM   #9
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It is actually taller than me, but still will not be hard to take down. I plan on girdling it this winter, then decide what to do with it after that. I might leave it in place as a snag, but if that doesn't look right, I'll try trimming it down to make it look like an old snag, and if I don't like the results, out it goes.

I want to grow a blackgum and some shrubs in its place--possibly blueberry bushes, but I'm open to suggestions.




Thanks for helping us get a better, bigger picture of what you have as well.

The field I mow is like your upland field. I can see how you'd have trouble down below. After getting it bush hogged, do you think you could mow down young ironweed early summer or dried ironweed early spring?
If you girdle it deeply and insure death, the woodpeckers, nuthatches, and solitary bees will quickly start tearing the bark off and making it look like an aged snag. I speak from experience. I have a downy woodpecker that is at mine each day. Of course. i gave it a head start when I drilled those mason bee holes (that they never used) into the trunk. Seems the holes attracted the attention of other insects, though, and then the woodpeckers became quickly interested in those insects. They're much better looking as snags then as trees (I promise).
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Old 08-20-2011, 08:17 PM   #10
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If you girdle it deeply and insure death, the woodpeckers, nuthatches, and solitary bees will quickly start tearing the bark off and making it look like an aged snag. I speak from experience. I have a downy woodpecker that is at mine each day. Of course. i gave it a head start when I drilled those mason bee holes (that they never used) into the trunk. Seems the holes attracted the attention of other insects, though, and then the woodpeckers became quickly interested in those insects.
Good to know. Thanks for the heads advice. I will likely try drilling holes, so even if I don't get mason bees, I'll hopefully attract other insects and the woodpeckers and nuthatches.

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They're much better looking as snags then as trees (I promise).
~smile~ I can believe that!
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