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Old 08-06-2011, 03:12 AM   #11
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Great idea about the air conditioner! For native plant gardening, this is probably cheating, but back when I used to grow cannas and dahlias, I put them near the dryer vent. (That was also when I used the dryer; ours quit last November and hasn't been fixed yet.) That way, when a really cold night was predicted, I did a load of laundry. The soil in that immediate area never froze, and I was able to grow semi-tender bulbs without digging them up in the winter.
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:09 AM   #12
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I was just thinking of posting about Clethra.

We have planted both Ruby Spice and the straight species.
Ruby Spice blooms first and just as it's tapering off the straight species gets underway.

Up North, your Clethra may just be getting started, but ours are slowing down and will probably be all finished blooming in another week.

Mine are mostly planted at the base of down-spouts--one is right next to an Asimina triloba (paw-paw) and the other is surrounded by Monarda didyma and Lobelia cardinalis.

The fragrance does travel quite a distance (a good reason to plant them near the house if possible) and they attract a variety of pollinators and butterflies. Last week there was a Zebra Swallowtail on one of the Clethra! Unfortunately I haven't seen any since and there are no signs of eggs on the Asimina.

We do have one Clethra planted outside my daughter's window, in a drier spot with afternoon sun. It blooms and grows well, but is not as long-lasting or fragrant in bloom or as vigorous in growth as those that are in moister areas. It might be my bias but it seems to me like the straight species is more fragrant and blooms a little longer. Next year I'll have to observe more closely.

If you have a place for one in your yard, especially in a location near your house or your outside living space, Clethra is definitely worth having!

(another favorite fragrant native of our is Chionanthus viginicus but that's a different thread. . .)
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Old 08-06-2011, 06:59 PM   #13
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I've got some Clethra here.... it's thinking about doing something but isn't quite decided what that something is yet. Here's a few things from an area I've been clearing phragmites and purple loosestrife out of.... bet everyone who knows what that third photo is is gonna freak out. Just remember... it's not bothering anyone or anything and it's definitely native and everything has its place in the bigger scheme of things.
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What has just started blooming in your garden?-img_5724.jpg   What has just started blooming in your garden?-img_5726.jpg   What has just started blooming in your garden?-img_5728.jpg  
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:42 PM   #14
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I've got some Clethra here.... it's thinking about doing something but isn't quite decided what that something is yet. Here's a few things from an area I've been clearing phragmites and purple loosestrife out of.... bet everyone who knows what that third photo is is gonna freak out. Just remember... it's not bothering anyone or anything and it's definitely native and everything has its place in the bigger scheme of things.
So long as everyone who frequents your property knows enough to stay away from it. Actually, I may have just stumbled upon a great crime preventer! Hide your most valuable possessions in a location where anyone plotting to rip you off must UNKNOWINGLY come in contact with that monster. The guilty party will be easily identifiable after the crime!!!
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:51 PM   #15
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It's too wet out there. Nobody goes out there except me and folk who know what it is. They're not afraid of it but.... most would be. Now there's an idea..... too bad we don't have any valuables left. Hmmmmmmm.... maybe I could plant some of those by my buckets of rabbit pellets.... I keep waiting for those to get ripped off. Maybe one of my chicks will turn out being an attack chicken.... that'd solve all the petty theft going on around here!!!
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:55 PM   #16
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Ummmm jack.... I'm thinking you better take a real close look at this thread. Some prankster wasted your avatar too.... ha ha ha ha ha.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:50 PM   #17
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Maybe one of my chicks will turn out being an attack chicken.... that'd solve all the petty theft going on around here!!!
My dad used to say that a goose was the best watchdog you could get.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:50 AM   #18
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My dad used to say that a goose was the best watchdog you could get.
He was correct! When I was in the service in Thailand many years ago, the temples often had geese in front of them. You took you life in your hands if you let them get too close to you! They could really nail you with pain.
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Old 08-07-2011, 10:53 AM   #19
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He was correct! When I was in the service in Thailand many years ago, the temples often had geese in front of them. You took you life in your hands if you let them get too close to you! They could really nail you with pain.
Ouch!

I tended to give them wide berth if I ever walked past a farm with them running free. They'd come out onto the street sometimes when my sister and I went on our 6 mile walk (no geese on the usual 4 mile walk). I still remember the story of when my two sisters were waking there and one nearly nipped on on her butt, except my other sister yelled and stomped her foot just in time (if memory serves).
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Old 08-07-2011, 08:14 PM   #20
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To return to the theme of this thread, sort of, in each forb's annual life cycle there is a period when it is most attractive to us, usually when the flowers are at their best. In the case of Yellow Wood Sorrel, it's best showing may be when it has the fullest foliage in conjuction with specks or dots of yellow flowers. This little patch is especially attractive just now - What has just started blooming in your garden?-oxalis-stricta.jpg
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alnifolia, asimina, august, blooming, boom, chionanthus, chionanthus viginicus, clethra, flowers, fragrance, fragrant, garden, late summer, native plants, pollinator activity, ruby spice, salvia penstemenoids, scent, smell, start, started, summer blooms, viginicus

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