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Old 07-08-2011, 06:27 AM   #21
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Thanks to all. The area closest to the neat neighbors is in really dense shade and so already doesn't look like much: pine needles, some struggling, really wispy grass, and some kind of white aster with tiny flowers. There's a bit more sun on the lot line going down the slope, so I'll be doing some soil checking there to determine the best species; in the meantime, we're mowing and weed-whacking that immediate area. Our house's previous long-time owner wasn't much of a gardener, especially in her later years, so the neighbors are cutting us some slack because we took out the dead tree that was leaning over their property and the two white pines that were--literally--on the lot line. Taking out healthy trees wounded my soul, but they really were in a bad spot, and we left the bottom eight feet or so of each standing. We have lonicera sempervirens growing on the dead tree visible from the neighbors' living room and are encouraging virginia creeper to climb the former pines, which are also hosting squirrel feeders.

Gloria, I never think of our area as the south since we're Zone 6, but I'll check out the book you mentioned.
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:53 PM   #22
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Taking out healthy trees wounded my soul, but they really were in a bad spot, and we left the bottom eight feet or so of each standing.
I can understand that. I have been putting off cutting out a huge tree that is way too close to our house--we need our roof replaced and want the tree out at the same time. I plan to leave as much of it as I can...maybe 8-10ft. I'd like to take a chainsaw to what we will leave standing, so I can create a more attractive looking snag.
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:47 AM   #23
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Okay, more advice needed now. We're finally getting rid of the Japanese yew hedge on both sides of the driveway (I tend to jump from project to project, depending on what I can get done when, and our neighbor's son-in-law has a tree service and was visiting the other day) and so will have two sunny strips roughly thirty feet long by five feet wide. On the side adjoining a neighbor's lawn, there is already a mature (male, so no berries) American holly that hosts lots of birds and pollinators. Those yews have already come out, and we have some seriously distraught birds who are missing their twiggy denseness adjoining the holly. I need advice on something that will stay small (under four feet in height) and provide some of the same songbird cover benefits as the yews. I haven't found any dwarf holly cultivars that aren't Asian, so I'm considering junipers because of their salt tolerance and the variety available. Alternately, I'm thinking of a row of short deciduous native shrubs that tolerate sand, salt, and sun, but will they be as useful for the birds? We have plenty of evergreen cover on our property (and for now are leaving some yews in the back in an inconspicuous place), but most of it is in the form of tall pines. BTW, we only own five or six feet on that side of the driveway. The neighbor and I need to check our plat maps to see exactly where the lot line is because she's been mowing everything up to the yews, and we may have an extra foot or two. (She has no problem with plantings that she doesn't have to mow but is a non-gardener.)

I'll post on the side facing our "hell strip" garden later; it will not be matching the other driveway strip as that side faces areas that we're already gardening.
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:11 PM   #24
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I don't have much to suggest for the hedgerow side at the moment..maybe with more thought I'll come up with something. I would say that native shrubs would likely be beneficial to the birds--despite not being evergreen. Hmm--I'm not sure of your soil there, but would Mt. Laurel fit in that section? It can grow taller than four ft...but I know there is a (named variety?) that is supposed to stay under four feet. I'm not sure about salt tolerance though...it *just* came to mind when I typed "evergreen".

Anyway, I, like you, tend to jump from project to project as well...then, hopefully back again. So, I can relate.

And...I know you said you'd start a different thread for the "hell strip" on the other side, but after hearing full sun...I immediately thought of adding several butterfly weed to that section among what ever else you plan to grow.

Hopefully more responses will come in soon for the hedgerow side.
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:21 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I don't have much to suggest for the hedgerow side at the moment..maybe with more thought I'll come up with something. I would say that native shrubs would likely be beneficial to the birds--despite not being evergreen. Hmm--I'm not sure of your soil there, but would Mt. Laurel fit in that section? It can grow taller than four ft...but I know there is a (named variety?) that is supposed to stay under four feet. I'm not sure about salt tolerance though...it *just* came to mind when I typed "evergreen".

Anyway, I, like you, tend to jump from project to project as well...then, hopefully back again. So, I can relate.

And...I know you said you'd start a different thread for the "hell strip" on the other side, but after hearing full sun...I immediately thought of adding several butterfly weed to that section among what ever else you plan to grow.

Hopefully more responses will come in soon for the hedgerow side.
Yea, I agree with Dap (gulp!), A. tuberosa sounds like a sure bet for the "hell strip."
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:36 PM   #26
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Yea, I agree with Dap (gulp!)
~quivering lower lip~

Am I really that bad!?
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:50 PM   #27
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~quivering lower lip~

Am I really that bad!?
Nope, you identified the boneset!!!!!!! Kudos there for you!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 07-17-2011, 02:24 PM   #28
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~smile~

~chuckle~ I guess that is the best I'm gonna get "not that bad".
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Old 07-17-2011, 02:47 PM   #29
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Rebek, I would go with a variety of native shrubs, especially those with berries.
Ilex verticillata, winterberry comes to mind- there are smaller cultivars like 'Red Sprite'
that is about 4'. You will need 1 male somewhere, I have 'Jim Dandy' hidden on the side of the house- he is one of the smaller males at 8'. You must match the male and females so bloom time overlaps. They tolerate both wet and sandy sites.
I have a friend that planted a line of these and underplanted them with green and gold,
Chrysogonum virginianum.
I also thought of Ilex glabra (inkberry) which is evergreen and also berries although the berries are hardly visible they are eaten.
The last one appears to be native only to Virginia, not WV. It might like wetter then your sandy soil.
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Old 07-17-2011, 03:16 PM   #30
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Another Ilex verticillata male that is sometimes found in garden centers here is Southern Gentleman.
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