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Old 07-05-2011, 10:24 AM   #11
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I live north but family has gone south from Texas to Florida and Arkansas so have seen some books on southern Landscapes. Living in an urban area you should check out Sally Wasowski's " Gardening with Native Plants of the South". She does a good job of considering garden limitations. For under 15 feet and dry she recommends Fothergilla Major,Hydrangea quercifolia/oakleaf, spicebush,evergreen blueberry,dwarf huckleberry,Geogia Basil,Hypericum frondosum/golden Saint John's wort or Hypericum densiflorum and mapleleaf viburnum.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:01 AM   #12
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Nice article Jack. I love hedgerows. Our urban garden has a couple of bounderies planted with shrubs and small trees. Aong the back is a redbud, a plum, two maples redtwig dogwood, hydrangea, holly and a lone struggling Itea. It really should be moved to the wet spot.
Out front is Red cedar/juniper,snowberry, aronia, maple, cherry.
all the really sunny areas go to prairie plants. they can create quite a screen as well. Some of the grasses and the sunflower types are very tall and the joe-pye weed is dense and tall after just a couple of years.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:23 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Nice article Jack. I love hedgerows. Our urban garden has a couple of bounderies planted with shrubs and small trees. Aong the back is a redbud, a plum, two maples redtwig dogwood, hydrangea, holly and a lone struggling Itea. It really should be moved to the wet spot.
Out front is Red cedar/juniper,snowberry, aronia, maple, cherry.
all the really sunny areas go to prairie plants. they can create quite a screen as well. Some of the grasses and the sunflower types are very tall and the joe-pye weed is dense and tall after just a couple of years.
I have quite a long hedgerow that contains three types of Viburnum, Hawthorne, Spicebush, Apple tree, Crab apple tree, standard American Plum (Prunus americanus) and persimmon trees. I've been trying to post a picture but it keeps rejecting it. I'm a failure at cropping the pictures :<

Yesterday, I was trimming some Viburnum trilobum that had grown so high it was blocking a meadow garden I had planted from full sun. I ended up exposing a catbird nest with chicks in it. I was so angry at myself!!! Anyway, I took a large branch and wedged it above the nest to block the sun and, perhaps, ward off predators. I didn't see what stage of development they were at, as it was too high. But I did see two beaks.

This adds insult to injury on this catbird whose presence here I treasure. He's the same on who I caught earlier in the HOSP trap. He wasn't happy that day. I'm sure he wasn't pleased yesterday either.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:55 PM   #14
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Sounds like a nice hedgerow that is doing its job if you have a catbird nesting. They are such a treat to have just visit my garden,would love to find a nest. Hope the babies succeed and the catbirds are forgiving of disturbance...
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:21 PM   #15
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Dap, mountain laurel is one of my favorites, too. We have a couple of large rhododendrons that were here when we bought the house, but they're not in optimal situations and look rather pitiful when out of bloom. Has anyone had success with moving large (as in eight-foot) rhododendrons?
We have one *huge* (~20 ft. tall) Rhododendron near the house--I'm trying to figure out if I should expose the trunk and treat it more like a tree. It is a hybrid--pink one so commonly used in landscaping. I'm planning on planting a several of the native ones intermingled with the mountain laurel and other things.

...As for moving something that large--I moved a large 6-7ft. dogwood successfully once--several years ago when my mother moved to a new house...I took one that was growing only a foot from the house--way too close. Surprisingly it took. My mother still talks about that.

As I did with the dogwood, I cut back the top growth because, even though I got a large rootball, I still cut a lot of feeder roots for sure. My guess is that you could cut it back the same day you plan to move it--that will make it easier to work with. I think I dug the dogwood first, then cut back some of the branches after I saw how many roots would be supporting it.

I hope this is helpful. Obviously, doing this in spring or fall and watering it well as it becomes re-established is best.
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:24 PM   #16
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Great suggestions, Gloria.
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:27 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by jack View Post
I have quite a long hedgerow that contains three types of Viburnum, Hawthorne, Spicebush, Apple tree, Crab apple tree, standard American Plum (Prunus americanus) and persimmon trees. I've been trying to post a picture but it keeps rejecting it. I'm a failure at cropping the pictures :<
Sorry you failed to crop it...do you think you could re-size it. Save it at a smaller size?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
Yesterday, I was trimming some Viburnum trilobum that had grown so high it was blocking a meadow garden I had planted from full sun. I ended up exposing a catbird nest with chicks in it. I was so angry at myself!!! Anyway, I took a large branch and wedged it above the nest to block the sun and, perhaps, ward off predators. I didn't see what stage of development they were at, as it was too high. But I did see two beaks.

This adds insult to injury on this catbird whose presence here I treasure. He's the same on who I caught earlier in the HOSP trap. He wasn't happy that day. I'm sure he wasn't pleased yesterday either.
Aww... At least you took measures to remedy the situation.

I know how much you cherish the catbird. I enjoy the one(s) I have, too.

I remember the story of trapping him...he got over that...he should get over this.
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Old 07-05-2011, 08:10 PM   #18
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If the neighbors are really quite picky, I'd probably spend a good deal of time on the overall design, the function and effect the plants should create. Then I'd take that to let a second and third set of eyes critique the plan. Garden clubs, community college professors (I think a lot of them still have horticulture and landscape courses), native plant societies, and botanical gardens/societies are all places you might find such people. In that way you can begin to reduce the size of the project to more manageable stages from deciding the overall picture to more specific details to several stages of refinement and eventually down to the specific plants to be used.
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:36 AM   #19
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Hello to all. Rebek56, I apologize if this has already been suggested but perhaps Ilex glabra, Inkberry, might be a good selection for the area near your neighbors? It is evergreen and looks a bit like boxwood, so it might not seem as "wild" to those accustomed to suburban "neat and tidy."
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Old 07-07-2011, 03:36 PM   #20
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Hello to all. Rebek56, I apologize if this has already been suggested but perhaps Ilex glabra, Inkberry, might be a good selection for the area near your neighbors? It is evergreen and looks a bit like boxwood, so it might not seem as "wild" to those accustomed to suburban "neat and tidy."
First, a BIG welcome back to Hedgerowe!

Second...great suggestion especially in an area where one wants the neighbors to feel at ease with the look of the planting.
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