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Old 02-04-2010, 10:31 PM   #11
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Was doing some horse trading with a local fella and I aquired some of these treasures . Some different forms/shapes of corrugated metal to build into lizard/snake mounds/hibernacula .

Pic . 1 - The new accumulation , the long rusted piece is over 15 feet long . The white ones some 5 1/2 feet long. All likely will be cut into shorter lengths .

pic. 2 - the rusted piece is some 32 inches wide

pic. 3 - When I place these I will likely place plywood or something flat both below and and top of them so as to one keep them from being pushed down into the earth which if I did not would push them into the earth filling the "tunnels" so as to make them unusable . Putting plywood on top will reinforce the cielings preventing collapse from any overburden .

pic 4 - the "tunnel entrances" some 1 3/4 inches high .

pic 5 - almost 2 1/2 inches wide at the base of the entrance .
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Old 02-04-2010, 10:58 PM   #12
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Those should work out real well for you!
I had saved quite a few pieces of metal siding from an old sawmill that fell in MANY MANY years ago and moved them alongside the edge of my field for that very same reason. You don't need to put plywood underneath it. The critters scritch it out as needed.
I love peeking underneath every now and then just to see what's using them.

I have found red belly (Dekay) snakes, grass snakes, Mice, voles, Blue spotted and yellow spotted salamanders, Little red belly salamanders, wood terrapins and even a few beautifully colored skinks.
Every now and then the ants will take it over so I move it over into a new area for the critters to enjoy once again.
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Old 02-05-2010, 01:44 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Those should work out real well for you!
I had saved quite a few pieces of metal siding from an old sawmill that fell in MANY MANY years ago and moved them alongside the edge of my field for that very same reason. You don't need to put plywood underneath it. The critters scritch it out as needed.
I love peeking underneath every now and then just to see what's using them.

I have found red belly (Dekay) snakes, grass snakes, Mice, voles, Blue spotted and yellow spotted salamanders, Little red belly salamanders, wood terrapins and even a few beautifully colored skinks.
Every now and then the ants will take it over so I move it over into a new area for the critters to enjoy once again.
I got a different size and shapes with that bunch and I think I have two more different sizes and shapes to pick up . By your description you have yours laying on the ground . Shame on you for picking them up ! If you persist in doing so I hope it is with the greatest of care . (I understand the impulse/desire) Moving slabs of wood , corrugated metal results in crushing a number of the creatures . I have rescued numbers of lizards from some incendental objects I have around here .

A story about rescuing one . After chasing one around a dry water tank , I suceeded in catching it . After catching it I gently tossed it outside, upon doing so I looked up to see I had tossed it virtually at the feet of one of the resident Roadrunners for whom this represented lunch/snack . I could see the delight in his eyes , A FREEBIE ! One that I did not have to chase/hunt/stalk here at my feet . Before he could snatch it I grabbed the hat off my head and lobbed it at the roadrunner spooking him sufficently to back off away from the lizard . I just did not consider the situation to be very sporting . I had just gotten done rescuing the lizard and desired to live longer than 15 seconds after leaving my hand . The roadrunner was welcome to it AFTER HE chased it . Sound about right ?

I learned that in picking up lizards some care needs to be taken in doing so . It is not too uncommon knowledge that lizards tails can break off and possibly regenerate/regrow . But this is possibly life threatening to the lizard as well . What many are not aware of is that tail is also where thier food engergy reserves are stored . Loosing the tail can maybe kill them .

Also lizards can nip . I have not found it to be particularly painful but all the same . If you can catch it around the neck area or just behind thier front legs thier is generally insufficent rotation in thier necks to turn and nip .

Metal surfaces can/will get EXTREMLY hot in the Arizona extremes , I will likely have to bury these leaving only the outer opening exposed . They will turn into true ovens if I don't . Also I intend to build a true hibernacium for the snakes . I have yet to aquire/select whatever pipe I will use but I will know it when I find it . Likely a pipe of some 6 feet in diameter to be installed vertically into the ground . Sudviding the vertical shaft I intend to build a window into one side of the hibernacium so as to give me a viewing port into the lower portion of the pit for observation . I have in hand a slab of glass some 56 inches long by 33 inches wide by 3/4 inches thick . That is one heavy piece of glass requiring two (wo)men to pick it up . It will be necessary to frame it in as any window so as to give me or any other who would dare to enter the pit protection from the creatures and vice versa . Any suggestions as to how to thermally insulate such an endeavor would be appreciated/considered . Remember that your clime there is not mine here . Want to enter the (proposed) pit with those slithery critters (the wife does'nt , the idea of such gives her the heebie jeebies) I still have some things to figure out about THAT critter !

Some more of the corrugated metal ;

Pic 1 - 38" wide

Pic 2 - the tunnels nearly 2 " wide at thier base

Pic 3 - almost 1" high .

Pic 4 - A bucket I discovered yesterday when housecleaning that had been left undisturbed for some time . 6 to 8 lizards are dead on the bottom . Any container with high steep sides will be death to a lot of these creatures where there is nothing to grasp .

Different sizes of pipes could be considered for such an endeavor . Two inch inside diameter and smaller is what I judge to be desireable , any other opinions on that ?

Some of Arizona's critters that I would like to invite here ;

Amphibians of Arizona

The Reptiles and Amphibians of Arizona

How am I doin' so far ?
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Old 02-09-2010, 12:18 PM   #14
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Too bad about your rescue gone bad. Are roadrunners that bold they don't run away when they see you?

I just realized you're intending upon burying yours a bit for hibernation.
Do you really need to worry about the heat if that's what it's being built for or are you thinking about summer use also?
If so, couldn't you insulate them from the heat by setting it in deeper? You'd need to bend an end up to the surface for entry. Plant a few brushy plants on top to look natural and add some cooling shade. Evaporation or wind is a good coolant. Scattered straw misted every now and then? I'm trying.....

QUOTE "By your description you have yours laying on the ground. Shame on you for picking them up! If you persist in doing so I hope it is with the greatest of care."

Mine are set on the ground for creature use, just not specifically for hibernation purposes such as yours intend to be although the mice do use it during the winter.
I'm extremely careful! I'm well aware of the possibility of crushing the creatures. Sometimes I need to cradle a salamander in my hand or cup a snake until I gently guide them back into the open end. The only reason I really check in on them is to see if I should relocate the tin due to the tremendous amount of ants that eventually take over.
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Old 02-09-2010, 03:37 PM   #15
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Yes , it is my intent to attempt to build a hibernacula so as to just maybe get some snakes to overwinter here . Much to my wifes concern .

http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jco0303l.jpg

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscart...s/jcon582l.jpg
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Old 02-09-2010, 07:21 PM   #16
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Hey I just thought of something..... Snakes overwinter here in old wishing wells.... Guess it's because they can go below the frost line slithering in between the stones the walls are usually made of.

Build yourself a wall of rocks around your vertical see through tube. Sounds easy enough!
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Old 03-22-2010, 12:26 AM   #17
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Here are the tins I had saved and set alongside a path for the critters to use.
Enhanced lizard/reptile habitat-dscf4432.jpg
I peeked under them and see they have housed quite a variety of creatures over the winter.
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Old 03-22-2010, 12:42 AM   #18
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Havalotta, now that's what I call recycling The tin went from waste to habitat.

You might enjoy this podcast with Will Bird talking about how he uses tin to find animals.
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