Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Habitat

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-24-2018, 01:53 PM   #11
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WI
Default

Heres a picture of the Critter Condo, the pile of stumps pulled.


Yesterday I sprayed all 2 acres with Glyphoste to kill off all weeds before I give the area a roughing up with a drag, plant seed, cover with straw and then water. Should be in Ma Natures hands in early June. I hope she is good to me and gives ample rains!
Attached Thumbnails
Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-flowers-011.jpg  
weedy feilds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 03:20 PM   #12
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: NJ
Default

Wow, what seed mix did you choose? How are you going to seed, broadcast, seed drill, etc? Is this a woodland or a meadow? Im really interested in the whole process
skip1909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 08:13 PM   #13
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WI
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skip1909 View Post
Wow, what seed mix did you choose? How are you going to seed, broadcast, seed drill, etc? Is this a woodland or a meadow? Im really interested in the whole process

This is a meadow, a prairie planting if you will.



I had some custom mixes made, 1 for a relatively shady damper area (1/4 acre) on the north side of the woods and the other for 3 smaller areas (approx. .15 acres) that flood and stay flooded for a couple of days after it rains. Then for the remaining majority (approx 1 3/4 acres) of it its approx 1/2 a "short grass" mix and the other half a "tallgrass" mix.
The short grass goes on the front side of the house (west) and south side of the house and the tallgrass goes in the rear and north side of the house.


The short and tall grass areas I mixed several different mixes so that I would have a larger diversity of plants. I figured that the bigger diversity would give me more chances of getting plants that really do well in my situation and a bigger diversity of plants supposedly helps to keep the weeds at bay. I had to keep plants with large taproots off of the septic field. So that area is a specific mix for over septic fields.


The plan is to broadcast the seed after mixing it with sand with a walk behind spreader. Most people use them to spread weed and feed on their lawns. I have to do some experiments with it to get a feel for settings so I can control how much seed for how many feet of distance. Then I can divide up my seed and make sure I have enough to cover everything.
weedy feilds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2018, 02:38 PM   #14
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Default

What a great project!

It should be a great resource for pollinators, butterflies and many other critters and insects that are so important to our natural ecosystems.

I couldn't agree more that diversity is a key consideration. When we planted our pollinator meadow we used a couple of different mixes as you have done. We even bought lots of individual packets of seeds to boost our species count up to 102. Not all of them will do well of course, but we will be maximizing the diversity to the extent that the area can support.

You haven't mentioned any shrub plantings, but if you have some room for a few they are very beneficial to the early pollinator species. Things like service berry (Amelanchier sp.), Wild Plum (Prunus sp.), and Willow (Salix sp.) are excellent sources for early pollen and nectar.

A great little plant that is often overlooked as and early pollen and nectar source is Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium reptans); the queen bumble bees and other early pollinators really like this plant.
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2018, 08:49 PM   #15
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEWisc View Post
What a great project!

It should be a great resource for pollinators, butterflies and many other critters and insects that are so important to our natural ecosystems.

I couldn't agree more that diversity is a key consideration. When we planted our pollinator meadow we used a couple of different mixes as you have done. We even bought lots of individual packets of seeds to boost our species count up to 102. Not all of them will do well of course, but we will be maximizing the diversity to the extent that the area can support.

You haven't mentioned any shrub plantings, but if you have some room for a few they are very beneficial to the early pollinator species. Things like service berry (Amelanchier sp.), Wild Plum (Prunus sp.), and Willow (Salix sp.) are excellent sources for early pollen and nectar.

A great little plant that is often overlooked as and early pollen and nectar source is Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium reptans); the queen bumble bees and other early pollinators really like this plant.
I loved seeing this post...I don't have nearly that much diversity (yet)...but I have several serviceberry (one mature one was already on the property and I've added others). I've added black willow and sandbar willow (there was a mature pussy willow already here. ...And I just added wild plum this year.

Great feedback on our little slice of the Internet.

I look forward to seeing pictures of this project...and the feedback others add.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2018, 10:12 PM   #16
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WI
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEWisc View Post
What a great project!

It should be a great resource for pollinators, butterflies and many other critters and insects that are so important to our natural ecosystems.

I couldn't agree more that diversity is a key consideration. When we planted our pollinator meadow we used a couple of different mixes as you have done. We even bought lots of individual packets of seeds to boost our species count up to 102. Not all of them will do well of course, but we will be maximizing the diversity to the extent that the area can support.

You haven't mentioned any shrub plantings, but if you have some room for a few they are very beneficial to the early pollinator species. Things like service berry (Amelanchier sp.), Wild Plum (Prunus sp.), and Willow (Salix sp.) are excellent sources for early pollen and nectar.

A great little plant that is often overlooked as and early pollen and nectar source is Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium reptans); the queen bumble bees and other early pollinators really like this plant.

I'm in the heavy thinking process about cleaning the woods that is to the west of my field of the majority of trees. Leaving only a few white oaks and a couple of black cherry. I'd do this back maybe 50 ft or so into the woods. In this area I'd have a few bushes such as serviceberry and more shade tolerant forbs.



Right now about 1/2 of this area is really degraded forest. The ground is covered with 90% or more of sugar maple seedlings less than a foot tall. Nothing else grows there. I'm thinking of cutting out the trees this summer, burning it this fall, planting it in the fall and seeing if I can't end up with a more gradual transition of 50 ft from prairie to forest instead of the current zero transition.


one problem with clearing out woods is the amount of brush I end up with. I beginning to have brush piles everywhere. When I cleared the field I rented a chipper for a day and cleaned up the brush piles. May have to do that again or buy a chipper. I can see using the chips for mulch on trails thru woods. Wife would like that. She does not like to bust brush when walking in woods. For a city girl she is appreciating the natural world more and more everyday and I'd like to keep that going.



So many plans and ideas and only so much time.
weedy feilds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 08:58 PM   #17
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weedy feilds View Post
...one problem with clearing out woods is the amount of brush I end up with. I beginning to have brush piles everywhere. When I cleared the field I rented a chipper for a day and cleaned up the brush piles. May have to do that again or buy a chipper. I can see using the chips for mulch on trails thru woods. Wife would like that. She does not like to bust brush when walking in woods. For a city girl she is appreciating the natural world more and more everyday and I'd like to keep that going.
Brush piles provide many benefits to wildlife. I created a pretty huge one. I have seen more and more white-throated sparrows here since then. I believe I have three pairs nesting in various places on our property. (I have a couple smaller brush piles in addition the the huge one.) Who knows what else uses them.

Very good to hear that your wife is connecting more and more with the natural world.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2018, 03:45 PM   #18
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WI
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Brush piles provide many benefits to wildlife. I created a pretty huge one. I have seen more and more white-throated sparrows here since then. I believe I have three pairs nesting in various places on our property. (I have a couple smaller brush piles in addition the the huge one.) Who knows what else uses them.

Very good to hear that your wife is connecting more and more with the natural world.

Yes they do. I have many brush piles as is.


One issue I have is I want to burn about 1/4 acre of woods to get rid of the Sugar Maple seedlings that dominate the area. No trilliums, wild geraniums, violets, bloodroots etc etc etc grow in that area. On the forest floor its a biological desert right now. After I open up the canopy to allow more light in for forbs and brush I don't want the Sugar Maples to dominate. I also don't want to herbicide the whole place.



If this works good I have other areas that I will repeat the process in.
The brush piles are a detriment to burning the areas and I could use the chipping from all the tree tops and smaller stuff to cover the trails in the woods.


I like to try different approaches and different methods for different areas and hopefully I get different and increasingly better results.


Here is a picture of the forest floor in another area that is dominated by sugar maple seedlings.
Its a pretty picture to the human eye but a desert for diversity of plants and animals.
Attached Thumbnails
Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-flowers-006.jpg  
weedy feilds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2018, 09:12 PM   #19
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weedy feilds View Post
Yes they do. I have many brush piles as is.


One issue I have is I want to burn about 1/4 acre of woods to get rid of the Sugar Maple seedlings that dominate the area. No trilliums, wild geraniums, violets, bloodroots etc etc etc grow in that area. On the forest floor its a biological desert right now. After I open up the canopy to allow more light in for forbs and brush I don't want the Sugar Maples to dominate. I also don't want to herbicide the whole place.



If this works good I have other areas that I will repeat the process in.
The brush piles are a detriment to burning the areas and I could use the chipping from all the tree tops and smaller stuff to cover the trails in the woods.


I like to try different approaches and different methods for different areas and hopefully I get different and increasingly better results.


Here is a picture of the forest floor in another area that is dominated by sugar maple seedlings.
Its a pretty picture to the human eye but a desert for diversity of plants and animals.
Great explanation. I understand more what you are trying to do now.

I like that you are trying different approaches. Not only is it an interesting experiment, but it should give you a variety of results...which hopefully translates to lot more biodiversity.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2018, 10:37 PM   #20
Grub
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WI
Default

I have been cleaning up getting ready to do some seeding. I had some "equipment" problems that has caused me to loose about a week of time. But I got back at it yesterday and today. Its all preped for seeding now. I seeded some of the trails thru the area that run in the middle of the future prairie. Tomorrow I start seeding, some issues to sort yet but like old the tortoise that I am I'll keep plodding along.


first picture is looking to the east you can see the "walking" trail that goes to the septic tank and then heads to the right over the septic field and down what I call the "septic hill".


Next picture is standing on the trail atop of the septic hill looking south. you can see the trail winding thru the small planting of apple trees and you can see the trail that runs along the bottom of the septic hill that runs right to left.


3rd picture is taken on the west side of the feild looking to the east at the trail that runs along the bottom of the septic hill.


4th picture is the east side of our property which is a fence line, you can see the trail running along the edge of the fence line. You can see how nice and prepped the soil is. What my lovely wife calls "clean dirt".


Last picture is a little bit of before and after of the soil.
Attached Thumbnails
Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-prairie-002.jpg   Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-prairie-003.jpg   Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-prairie-004.jpg   Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-prairie-006.jpg   Mr. Weedy's hopefully no longer weedy field project-prairie-010.jpg  

weedy feilds is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
field, longer, project, weedy

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2