Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Habitat

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-13-2015, 12:11 PM   #1
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default Latest Habitat Project

Although, I've not updated my "pond and streambed thread", or my "Eastern meadow project"...nor, come to think of it, my "pocket woodland" one either, I'm going to start this on my latest idea.
Latest Habitat Project-20150810_192623-ps.jpg

I've been fascinated by "rocky outcrops", barrens, thin soils in full sun and the rugged plants that grow in these places. After talking with a biologist from the WHIP program (still not approved for the grant, and I think I have to resubmit for next year). I realized that I don't want any lawn. He told me during the tour, after I'd explained about mowing paths, that the grass from the paths would infiltrate the meadow plantings. Good point. After that, and with the eyes of a dreamer with (potential) grant money coming in, I began to fantasize about how to plant the paths...AND the front yard, or any low, growing clearings.
Latest Habitat Project-20150810_192452-crop.jpg

I began to picture a mosaic of low-growing native flowers with some shorter grasses, sedges, and rushes (gotta do more research there). One thing I pictured was birdsfoot violet. Year and years ago, Jeff and I pulled off on Skyline Drive and I saw a naturally occurring grouping of natives in a thin soil on a rocky area. There were Antenaria, birdsfoot violet, and Potentilla (simplex?)--I was enthralled. I've often wanted to mimic that on our property, and now I've begun to do just that.

Earlier this summer, while traveling for "business", and I found a native nursery nearby--I only get there once or twice a year, if that--it is quite a distance. The owner had birdsfoot violet! Local ecotype, at that! I asked her about it and her source was my favorite nursery that specializes in plants of local ecoregions! (I've since gone back to his place and bought more birdsfoot violet directly from him.)

I was concerned that they would not survive without specialized soil requirements. I am thrilled to say that they seem to be thriving in full sun on the soil that accumulated around a virtually buried rock! It is an odd place for me to grow them...*right* on the edge of the driveway, but it is the best spot for them right now--hopefully, I can create another spot in a rocky outcropping out in the second acre (my first choice, but too overrun by weeds right now). I'm actually happy to have them where I see them daily.

So far, I've put in the birdsfoot violet, Campanula rotundfolia (one my dad grew in his rockgarden along with...), Antennaria virginica (that I *just* bought from my favorite nursery. I also have seeds collected from A. neglecta.), Potentilla simplex, a bush clover (gotta look that one up), and even that little yellow wood sorrel that is often viewed as a weed--the native one, not the European one. Near by, I've added some asters, and those sundrops (related to evening primrose...I think they are native--they were in the flowerbeds here), and I plan to add Asclepius tuberosa, butterflyweed.

(While looking for pics of the birdsfoot violet in bloom, I came across this--another addition I forgot to mention above: Penstemon hirsutus.)
Latest Habitat Project-20150810_180930-ps.jpg

If you made it through this long, rambling post, now is the time I'll ask for more suggestions for this full, sun site that will be my version of a rockgarden, rocky pasture. Any ideas?

Thanks.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~

Last edited by dapjwy; 08-13-2015 at 12:18 PM. Reason: Adding more photos
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 02:42 PM   #2
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

More photos, plants I forgot I'd added, and a question or two:

I forgot that the first plants I added here were not only the birdsfoot violet, but also some bluets! I love bluets, and have had no success with them the one time I tried. That didn't stop me from purchasing some this spring...and planting them here (as well as another section closer to the house that I am working on). So far, so good--they continued to bloom on and off for a while after I put them in. Currently they look very healthy as a think patch of leaves.
Latest Habitat Project-20150813_150611-ps.jpg

Latest Habitat Project-20150813_150649-ps.jpg

Another that I forgot to mention that I'd like to add is blue-eyed grass--I really like it, and Jeff *loves* it--gotta keep him happy and interested in my projects, right?

Two things have come up there on their own that would normally be viewed as weeds by the general public, but, if they are native and won't out compete the bluets and birdsfoot violets, they are more than welcome to become part of the mosaic. One is a purslane (Portulaca spp.) the other, I've no idea, but read recently online that it was native. Here is a close-up pic of both:

Latest Habitat Project-20150813_150654-ps.jpg



Does anyone know if they are native or not?

The quick search I did of the purslane seemed to indicate that it was native, but I thought I saw some conflicting information.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 06:24 PM   #3
Heron
 
rockerBOO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Lower Pioneer Valley
Default

Spotted spurge (Euphorbia maculata) is the other one, both are native.
__________________
Rebuilt Backyard - Photoblog of progress in my backyard.
Flickr Photo Group - Share your photos with us on Flickr
rockerBOO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 09:06 PM   #4
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
Spotted spurge (Euphorbia maculata) is the other one, both are native.
Thanks, rB. I looked it up with the botanical name...trying to find out if there are any faunal associations.

I'm happy to include it...especially because it is a low mat-former.

I'm hoping that these two (that and the purslane) will not out compete the more rare wildflowers.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 08:27 AM   #5
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Thanks, rB. I looked it up with the botanical name...trying to find out if there are any faunal associations.

I'm happy to include it...especially because it is a low mat-former.

I'm hoping that these two (that and the purslane) will not out compete the more rare wildflowers.
ALl sounds great, Dap. One thing, what did you decide to use as a substitute for grass for the path through the meadow??? Is this where you will be planting the puslane, etc?

By the way, did you know that purslane is a commonly used vegetable around the world, and that it is packed with nutrition??? One can eat it raw as one weeds in the garden!!!

Also, were those pictures taken with a cell phone? If so, that picture of the bluet came out really nicely!
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 12:44 PM   #6
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
ALl sounds great, Dap. One thing, what did you decide to use as a substitute for grass for the path through the meadow??? Is this where you will be planting the puslane, etc?

By the way, did you know that purslane is a commonly used vegetable around the world, and that it is packed with nutrition??? One can eat it raw as one weeds in the garden!!!

Also, were those pictures taken with a cell phone? If so, that picture of the bluet came out really nicely!

I've yet to plant the paths...although, I did start smothering alongside where I sowed that strip of meadow...between it and the grass path. I'm hoping to seed it and smother more of the path--probably I will use path rush and any of the shorter grasses/sedges/rushes that I can find (still have lots of research to do). I'll welcome any forbs that can handle the mowing and a bit of trampling. Common violets seem like they may work well. I'm more than open to other suggestions...like the purslane--not something I'd have thought of...although, it didn't seem to show its face until a few weeks ago, and is just starting to fill in now.

I had heard that it was edible and nutritious...but, I had no idea that it was packaged and sold!

I should see about adding it to a salad...or, *possibly* just nibbling it while weeding as you suggested--although a bit of salt or something may make it more palatable--who knows. What is the texture like? (I'm second guessing the salad thing.)
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 12:57 PM   #7
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post

Also, were those pictures taken with a cell phone? If so, that picture of the bluet came out really nicely!
Yes, they were. Samsung S5.

It still doesn't function like a quality digital camera, but that is expecting a lot. ...Hmmm I wonder if I could buy a telephoto lens as an accessory.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 06:18 PM   #8
Heron
 
rockerBOO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Lower Pioneer Valley
Default

Purslane is like a LOT better lettuce with NO bitterness. Its a succulent, so it is squishy slightly, but I love it. No salt or anything necessary IMO.
__________________
Rebuilt Backyard - Photoblog of progress in my backyard.
Flickr Photo Group - Share your photos with us on Flickr
rockerBOO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 08:35 PM   #9
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
Purslane is like a LOT better lettuce with NO bitterness. Its a succulent, so it is squishy slightly, but I love it. No salt or anything necessary IMO.
Smile.

Maybe I'll reach down, break off a piece, and give it a try--but I'm gonna wait until Jeff is watching to see if I can get a reaction (doubt I will, I think he is too used to me by now).

Now, we all agree that I did correctly ID the purslane, right?

So...are the garden Portulaca (sp.?) edible too?
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 05:59 PM   #10
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Smile.

Maybe I'll reach down, break off a piece, and give it a try--but I'm gonna wait until Jeff is watching to see if I can get a reaction (doubt I will, I think he is too used to me by now).
Now, we all agree that I did correctly ID the purslane, right?
Oh yes...It's Purslane and oh boy, you'll have a reaction all right....Not going to tell ya what.... You'll find out! Nothing deadly to worry about but it'll be a surprise! Let me know what you think after you've bitten off a piece and shewed it for a while.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
habitat, latest, project

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2