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Old 07-26-2013, 12:46 AM   #1
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poison Common Agricultural Chemicals Shown to Impair Honey Bees' Health

Common Agricultural Chemicals Shown to Impair Honey Bees' Health
First study of real world conditions for crop-pollinating honey bee

American Bee Journal
July 24, 2013 ABJ Extra
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The study, published July 24 in the online journal PLOS ONE, is the first analysis of real-world conditions encountered by honey bees as their hives pollinate a wide range of crops, from apples to watermelons.
Quote:
The researchers collected pollen from honey bee hives in fields from Delaware to Maine. They analyzed the samples to find out which flowering plants were the bees' main pollen sources and what agricultural chemicals were commingled with the pollen.
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On average, the pollen samples contained 9 different agricultural chemicals, including fungicides, insecticides, herbicides and miticides. Sublethal levels of multiple agricultural chemicals were present in every sample, with one sample containing 21 different pesticides.
Quote:
"We don't think of fungicides as having a negative effect on bees, because they're not designed to kill insects," vanEngelsdorp said. Federal regulations restrict the use of insecticides while pollinating insects are foraging, he said, "but there are no such restrictions on fungicides, so you'll often see fungicide applications going on while bees are foraging on the crop. This finding suggests that we have to reconsider that policy."
ABJ Extra


Note: It seems reasonable to suggest that native pollinators are being exposed to these same pesticides when they gather pollen from these plants.
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Old 07-27-2013, 02:37 PM   #2
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Well it's the middle of July and I've still got flower beds that didn't get planted

On a plus note my tulip trees and spice bushes are putting on good growth. A side note- Visited a website and spicebush is an Understory tree that grows near Tulip tree... I think I've come across a native companion planting!

Well I got the bright idea counting on my fingers anything I seeded would be killed by frost before it flowered.

Till I looked at the Buckwheat I bought and it flowers in 3 weeks, Well it's an insect magnet and I read it's quite the nectar plant and is favored by Bee Keepers.

So now that the bees have something to use hopefully the squirrels will find the seeds along with the bunnies
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Old 08-03-2013, 07:52 AM   #3
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bumblebee Buckwheat

Well I planted the bed with Buckwheat and while it grew I read up on it's good properties; The small flowers make it easier for some of our smaller pollinators to get to the nectar which I found out only is released from the flowers in the morning.

The plants seem to flower from top to bottom so some flowers are well protected in the center of the patch

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Old 08-03-2013, 08:03 AM   #4
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Ya know.... a tulip tree I started from seed maybe 4-5 years ago put on at least 2' of growth this year.... blew me away. Seemed like it was just yesterday it was 6" tall and already it's pert near as tall as the roof to our porch.
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Buckwheat does make an excellent cover crop... less weeding to do if that's planted after veggies are harvested. I keep meaning to get around to planting it when I take out a whole row of anything but.... so far.... it hasn't happened. It just keeps getting pushed to a back burner. Maybe I should pick up some seed so I don't have any excuse for not planting it for my bees!!! Thanks for some motivation spruce!!!!
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Old 08-03-2013, 08:41 AM   #5
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Glad you are feeling better Equil... Well I guess you are since the Zombie avatar is gone.

Maybe if you look at Buckwheat as a medicine for the bees and for you too.

Buckwheat may not be the best in a high wind field but a row or two should be alright.

I'm also going to pick the seed and prepare it for a breakfast meal instead of the sugar-coated stuff in the store.

Supposed to contain a better sugars health-wise.
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Old 08-03-2013, 08:56 AM   #6
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I think getting a tooth yanked just flat out sucks but.... it was the infection from the abscess that got me and then losing sleep to feeding the babies combined with me having to work more hours because of so many people taking vacation days. It happens. Planting buckwheat is something that's been on my to do list for a coupla years. Problem is I keep forgetting to order the seed in winter when I'm ordering the rest of my seed and then when I've got the extra time to plant it.... I don't have the seed. My neighbor told me the feed store might still have some left so I'll go over and check later on today. I won't be planting in a high wind field or anything.... just my raised veggie beds. The biggest problem I've been having this year are the rabbits eating my bean plants and the raccoons knocking over my corn stalks!!! Those wascally waccoons!!!
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I dunno anything about cleaning buckwheat seed. You'll have to post some photos of how you do that!!! No sugar coated cereals over here... even when the kids were little I refused to buy that crap. We do make buckwheat pancakes a few times a year only I've always bought the flour from the store. I bet the seed could be ground down into a flour easily enough.

adding> I didn't get rid of the zombie avatar..... the "gremlin" did.
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Last edited by Equilibrium; 08-03-2013 at 08:57 AM. Reason: adding something
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