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Old 02-24-2015, 12:25 PM   #31
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Seed balls are seeds in a clay mixture. Adding a little compost to can give a microbial innoculant, but too much and they will fall apart.

Let them dry out, and they will be a solid ball for planting.


http://www.wildflower.org/seedgrant/...ivity_2011.pdf
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Old 02-25-2015, 06:23 AM   #32
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... I wonder if adding some compost/soil on top of the cardboard under the wood chips would help ...
I was thinking the same thing. You can use triple-shred, which is a mixture of compost and shredded wood chips. I plan on trying this when I lay out a new native forb bed later in the spring. I figure I can then plant in September.
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Old 02-25-2015, 11:43 AM   #33
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Pretty much what I had suggested in post #25
The verdict seems to be......Add some soil to your chips
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:29 PM   #34
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I'm getting impatient as well, Dap, and I've thought about trying this...but haven't done it yet. My experience with cardboard has been that some breaks down fairly quickly (which would probably allow the babies roots to penetrate) and some takes more time. I wonder if adding some compost/soil on top of the cardboard under the wood chips would help get the seeds established?

I will probably be trying this either this spring or in the fall. I just have so many areas I still want to work on and seed is more affordable than plants.
My concern with adding soil is that it might contain weed seeds. Also, I don't want to make it a raised bed. It is such a large area, I doubt I'd have enough compost to cover it all. If you all try it, I'd love to hear your results.

As for seed being more affordable, I agree...but another great benefit is that they provide much more genetic diversity.


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I was thinking the same thing. You can use triple-shred, which is a mixture of compost and shredded wood chips. I plan on trying this when I lay out a new native forb bed later in the spring. I figure I can then plant in September.
I hope that works out for you.

You have me wondering if I might end up sowing in September as well...perhaps I can sow some in the spring my way, and then spend time preparing some more sections for fall planting. I have so many sections, I expect to do 5hismornijg for at least three years before the whole meadow is finished. By then, the first year's planting will be mature.
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:43 PM   #35
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My attempt is to put seed balls into the wood chips. This should be able to germinate seeds in the seed ball and not require a lot of changes to the mulch.
Can you explain more about seed balls, rockerBOO?
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:51 PM   #36
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A bed I had created mid Summer by first topping off the grass with cardboard then soil was decayed enough by fall so I could plant plants I had purchased or grown in pots. GO FOR IT!
It is an ongoing project with a lot of land to cover/smother, so, I feel like I can experiment...and, as long as I'm getting something done towards my vision, I will feel productive. It seems that I should be farther along by now than I am. I finally realized I need to direct sow large areas and I've been collecting and creating my own seed mix. Each year I 2ill have more and more seed as the plants mature...so, eventually my meadow will come to pass.
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:56 PM   #37
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Seed balls? What do you do? Compress a wad of soil with seeds? and set it in the chips?
That is what I was envisioning too--like that thread from way back suggesting that one could throw them, roll them into hard to reach areas.
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Old 02-25-2015, 07:59 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
Seed balls are seeds in a clay mixture. Adding a little compost to can give a microbial innoculant, but too much and they will fall apart.

Let them dry out, and they will be a solid ball for planting.


http://www.wildflower.org/seedgrant/...ivity_2011.pdf
Ok. So, I was picturing it right...what is the benefit in your mind to plant them that way instead of just sowing them directly by scattering them in the traditional way.
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Old 02-25-2015, 08:09 PM   #39
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Pretty much what I had suggested in post #25
The verdict seems to be......Add some soil to your chips
Hmm...I still have the issue about whether or not the roots will making it through the cardboard barrier.
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Old 02-27-2015, 07:22 PM   #40
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Ok. So, I was picturing it right...what is the benefit in your mind to plant them that way instead of just sowing them directly by scattering them in the traditional way.
They can sprout where little to no exposed soil is available or practical. Trying it in the old lawn > meadow transition where I am not removing the lawn grass, so little exposed soil is there.
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