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Old 03-21-2009, 10:57 AM   #1
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Default Schizachyrium scoparium/little bluestem seed propagation?

We have just one clump of Schizachyrium scoparium/little bluestem which produced seed last year. I waited until the seed had been on the stems through fall and early winter then harvested. Since they have been in an envelope in the garage (not heated).
I had planned on winter sowing but read that dry stratification would be better.
Has anyone started this grass from seeds? Good success rate? Any tips for native grass propagation?
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Old 03-21-2009, 11:03 AM   #2
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I've started it from seed. I winter sowed it starting in December. High germination rate. Schizachyrium scoparium PLS - Little Bluestem (Seed) Prairie Moon recommends dry stratification. Go for it. Start now.
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Old 03-23-2009, 10:25 AM   #3
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Thanks for the information Equilibrium. I started some of the seed in wintersow containers this weekend. It will be at least a couple of months before it will be warm enough to grow.
I have started other grasses this way. The Panicum/switchgrass and prairie dropseed/sporobolus did well although the sporobolus is very slow.
Any suggestions for a native sedge that stays short?
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Old 03-23-2009, 02:51 PM   #4
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I grow fox sedge in my yard. It stays short because my dogs eat it. They really like fox sedge and will graze on it more than any other plant in the yard. Its very odd?
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Old 03-23-2009, 09:31 PM   #5
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Carex pensylvanica could be used. That doesn't grow much taller than a foot. You could mow it if you wanted to.
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Old 03-31-2009, 02:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Any suggestions for a native sedge that stays short?
I can think of a few native sedges that are popular because they're shorter - but their success would depend largely on your sun/soil.

I agree that Carex pensylvanica would be a nice choice - under a foot. People love it because it is one of only a few native sedges that does well in full sun to full shade and likes medium-dry soil; most of the shadier Carex need a moister soil. It's quite difficult to germinate from seed, which is why most will buy a few roots and keep splitting them as the years go on - spreads by runners. Carex brevior is easier to grow from seed.

We (Prairie Moon) now have Carex rosea in plant (seed is always hard to come by like with C. pensylvanica) another great drier, savanna/woodland sedge, at about 1 ft max. Carex eburnea falls in this category too, at about 6" max.

Carex sterilis and C. typhina are nice full sun, wetter sedges that would reach about 1'.
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joepyeweed View Post
I grow fox sedge in my yard. It stays short because my dogs eat it. They really like fox sedge and will graze on it more than any other plant in the yard. Its very odd?
Hey, some of us like a salad before our meal. . . . fox sedge salad must be a delicacy.
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Old 03-31-2009, 09:01 PM   #8
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I just did moist stratification and within a couple days of bringing it out of the fridge, I had massive germination. I wasn't really ready yet, so I had to get all the flats ready real fast.
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Old 03-31-2009, 09:51 PM   #9
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Little bluestem germinates anywhere, any time. I don't think it even needs any kind of stratification. I had some germinate once in a bag of peat moss in a dark closet!
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Old 04-01-2009, 01:52 PM   #10
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Welcome to you amelanchier.
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bluestem, forbs native forbs, grass, grow, little bluestem, native grasses, plant, planting, prairie dropseed, propagation, schizachyrium, scoparium, scoparium or little, seed, seeds, sow, sowing, winter sowling

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