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Old 02-25-2013, 10:40 AM   #21
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I don't dry stratify Little Bluestem.... I get pert near 100% germination rate on it just winter sowing it. I'd broadcast it if it wouldn't get gobbled up by hungry critters over winter. You sure it was me suggesting dry stratification? If it was....sheesh... sorry about that.... I musta been having an out of body experience when I typed that.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:50 PM   #22
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I don't dry stratify Little Bluestem.... I get pert near 100% germination rate on it just winter sowing it. I'd broadcast it if it wouldn't get gobbled up by hungry critters over winter. You sure it was me suggesting dry stratification? If it was....sheesh... sorry about that.... I musta been having an out of body experience when I typed that.
Good to know. I planted mine in pots two weeks ago, put them outside, and covered them with a screen to protect them from anything that wants to eat them.

I'm really hoping to get close to 100% germination!

I'd have to look back to see who suggested dry stratification. It doesn't matter to me as long my plantings grow.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:53 PM   #23
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You sure it was me suggesting dry stratification? ...
Well, here is what I found:

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I've started it from seed. I winter sowed it starting in December. High germination rate. Schizachyrium scoparium PLS - Little Bluestem (Seed) Prairie Moon recommends dry stratification. Go for it. Start now.
Technically, you didn't suggest it; you said that Prairie Moon recommends it.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:25 AM   #24
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I have a question about small self sown little blue.
When is a good time to move it? Early spring before new growth ? or should I wait to move them when I see green new growth.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:10 AM   #25
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I've been planting what I winter sowed in summer. I'd think self sown seedlings should be able to be planted out after they've started active growth. Transplanting when they're dormant would be preferred though.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:34 AM   #26
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thanks. I'll move them as soon as the ground is workable.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:23 PM   #27
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The few that grew for me last year I planted in the fall. I hope they take and get established there.

This year I planted a LOT of seed, and I'm really hoping that I have great success with them. I'm longing for a field of native grasses and wildflowers, and I know I want large swaths of little bluestem.
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Old 07-12-2014, 02:16 PM   #28
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I found the best time to plant it is late May. Little Bluestem doesn't require much, and just requires temperature to germinate. Prevents a lot of predation from birds, especially waiting so long. The juncos and sparrows have spread out and won't eat as much, unless you have a high population of birds with a bird feeder or something else.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:48 PM   #29
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I found the best time to plant it is late May. Little Bluestem doesn't require much, and just requires temperature to germinate. Prevents a lot of predation from birds, especially waiting so long. The juncos and sparrows have spread out and won't eat as much, unless you have a high population of birds with a bird feeder or something else.
Hmm...I'll have to keep that in mind.

I was planning on direct sowing some areas that I'm smothering now. It is only a small section...probably perfect for experimenting. Up until now, I've done my winter sowing in containers.

I was concerned about birds or even voles or something getting the seeds over the winter. I hadn't thought to wait until so late in May. Everything seems to start germinating by April.

I'd hate to waste the seed, but if I have plenty for my small section, I think I may sow some in the winter some late May...and maybe over-seed one of the winter sowed sections in May to double up the germination.

Do the seed need any kind of preparation? I normally just let the normal freezing and thawing do what it would naturally...but if you say to sow in May, I am wondering how to store/prepare the seed.
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Old 08-11-2014, 01:47 PM   #30
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Warm season grass is designed to germinate in warm soil (same time you'd plant out tomatoes, peppers, corn, soybeans), but the seed on the plant doesn't finish growing till late in the warm season and drops over the winter. So when it drops it doesn't germinate till the next time it warms up. Most warm season grasses are like this, if not all grasses.

To store just put in a bag anywhere out of moisture and heat. If you have stored lawn seed, same thing.
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bluestem, forbs native forbs, grass, grow, little bluestem, native grasses, plant, planting, prairie dropseed, propagation, schizachyrium, scoparium, scoparium or little, seed, seeds, sow, sowing, winter sowling

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