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Old 02-18-2009, 03:45 PM   #11
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What I really wanted to say is, Get rid of the Norway maple! Cut it down, and get the stump ground out. It will eventually defeat you, if you allow it to live in your yard. This species has an unusual ability to compete for soil moisture, to the detriment of anything else growing in the vicinity.
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Old 02-18-2009, 04:33 PM   #12
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Not yet, Eric. Some of the plants I'm starting could do with a bit of shade at first, or my hot hot hot front yard will cook them. When I'm done using the young norway as shade, I'll lop it, and then maybe use the regrowth for basket-weaving. And/or I will girdle it and use it to attract woodpeckers and grow vines on. It may be a pest, but since it's already there, I'll get as much use out of it as possible.

I have no budget for stump removal, btw.
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Old 02-18-2009, 05:28 PM   #13
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Yikes, the Norway Maples I've seen did have quite a root system right at and just under the soil surface, woodpecker pole sounds like a good plan for the tree I have to admit I too would be worried about the competition the norway would produce at least a little beyond its dripline. Maybe use a spade to cut a little trench and sever most of the existing roots? I don't know anything about those trees, but I bet they are pretty shallow rooted. Maybe you could drill some holes in it and use it a suet feeder too
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Old 02-19-2009, 10:38 PM   #14
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I'm thinking the same way as Erictjohnson and midwesternerr, I have a real hard time picturing a small tree having a good chance near a Norway maple, even well beyond its dripline. Its roots might quickly monopolize a new, well-watered planting hole nearby. Just be aware of it, I guess, and get ready to whack the maple before it gets too big.

Prunus serotina can grow in sandy soils.

Last edited by swamp thing; 02-19-2009 at 11:17 PM. Reason: cross posted, spelling
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Old 03-03-2009, 11:32 AM   #15
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Hi guys! I'm sorry I didn't get back to you when you replied. I meant to tell you - the norway maple in question isn't very large just yet - I can just about encircle its trunk with both hands.

The ground thawed this past weekend, and I did a lot of digging. I think in the process I severed a quarter of the Norway's roots. While I was out there, I lopped off its lower branches as well. I'm thinking that with this abuse it will play nicely with the new plants for at least the first year.

Understand that my front yard heats up and dries out fast in the summer's heat - fast enough that getting new plants established here will be difficult. The bit of shade this tree povides will help.

Here's just some of the digging I did this weekend. The norway maple is that thin trunk in the upper left. Sorry, I haven't had time to get a proper shot of the tree itself!
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Wild Black Cherry, Prunus Serotina-gabes_garden_rocks_01_small.jpg  
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Old 03-05-2009, 12:49 AM   #16
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Prunus serotina is a fast growing, weak wooded tree. I would not plant it too close to my house, LOL! It's prone to rot, and it's something to look out for in this species.
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Old 03-05-2009, 02:43 AM   #17
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I have to disagree, Black Cherry is not considered a weak wood; it's similar to maple in shear and bending strength. There are different populations of Prunus serotina, and the ones in the east (PA, upstate NY, and wherever they haven't all been cut down in New England) grow really well and are still harvested for furniture making some places. It's a long-lived species which is unusual for a fast growing tree.

My cousins still have the old family farm house and barn in NY, made almost entirely of cherry about two hundred years ago! I guess it was the only tree around at the time. It would be unthinkable today.:eek:
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Old 03-05-2009, 11:00 AM   #18
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Thanks for the information guys!
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Old 03-05-2009, 11:29 AM   #19
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Growth rate of juveniles is very fast. Not so fast as they mature. I wouldn't classify P. serrotina as a weak wood but would be curious to know why you would. They are susceptible to some diseases. More so when stressed by not being properly sited but aren't other species equally as "weak" when cultural requirements aren't met?
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Old 03-06-2009, 01:24 AM   #20
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There are plenty of P. serotina growing in the wildlands in my area, which is fine, they're native.

Most of them have "hollows." and quite frankly, they don't look that good. 30 feet straight up 'til the first branch. My only point is that while they're an excellent yard plant, they're not so much a plant for native habitats.
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