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Old 12-04-2008, 10:29 AM   #11
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TheLorax, I generally make my recipes up, and I often don't write them down. I'm a terrible person to ask for recipes, because I'm apt to respond, "oh, just put some of this, some of that, until it looks like cookie dough (or whatever)". I can try, though. You can substitute almost any chopped nut for any other in existing recipes, which is a great excuse for using acorns or other native nuts.

What needs posted is instructions for making acorns edible -- they usually have to be boiled in several changes of water to get the tannins out, and with larger acorns like chestnut oak acorns, this is easier to do if you chop them up first. My white oak gives little acorns that boil out fine as they are, but they're more trouble to shell because you have to do so many more of them.

I forgot I made basil pesto with acorns instead of pine nuts or walnuts. That was a one-for-one substitution, too.
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Old 12-04-2008, 10:35 AM   #12
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Hey, I just looked at the link you posted at the beginning of this thread (finally, huh)! The chestnuts they're selling almost can't be natives unless they have a time machine...
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Old 12-04-2008, 10:55 AM   #13
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http://www.acf.org/

there are American chestnuts. You can get trees. The nuts are probably not commercially available yet.
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:07 AM   #14
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Although the chestnut blight wiped out almost all of the plants just like EAB is going to wipe out almost all of our Ash trees, there are still a few native chestnuts around producing. I've even gotten my hands on some to germinate. Granted, they don't last long but they're out there.

The chestnut I've been growing is 'Timburr' which is chestnut blight resistant and has quite a bit of native dna in it. That would be my suggestion for a Chestnut to plant. It fills a niche vacated by our native Chestnut and quite nicely I might add.
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Old 12-04-2008, 01:56 PM   #15
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Jenny, I've always worked with "dry" nuts. Picking up the windfall with gloves (yep, the hulls are wonderful dye) Usually sit them to the side for several days while we gather enough to make it worth while, then freeze. Got some nut "powder" but really not enough to piddle with. I was mainly interested in the meat. I divide it up, and sit the extra back in the freezer until I need it for something.
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Old 12-04-2008, 01:59 PM   #16
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The Lorax: Is your Timburr chestnut in production yet?

Hey, y'all what about HAZELNUTS?
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Old 12-04-2008, 05:58 PM   #17
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No, none of them are mature enough to fruit. Someday.

Ahhh, hazelnuts. Love them. They fruit at such a young age. Definitely one of my favorites.
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Old 12-04-2008, 06:55 PM   #18
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Mast crops are known to be maximal at intervals - say 4 years or 6 years.
In prehistoric times during lean times the mast crops might be harvested by single dispersed families, but during those years when the nuts were most abundant the largest social groups would gather to harvest the crop.

In those years a person would see distant cousins and relatives only seen during those years when there were more nuts.
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Old 12-04-2008, 08:57 PM   #19
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I use the dye from walnuts to dye the braintan buckskin i make,i also extract tannin from red oak acorns,i use it to make vegetable tan leather
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Old 12-04-2008, 10:28 PM   #20
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The dye from walnuts is quite strong. I screwed around with it once tie dying an old towel just to see for myself.

I know you're a deer hunter and I know you pick up all kinds of road kills and make interesting things out of them but it's neat to know you're not just loading freezers with the venison and that you're using the hides too.

I don't know if you are aware of this but you can toss the skeleton back out into the woods and let the scavenger crew have at it as well as rodents that need to file their teeth down. Toss a skeleton out after you process it for the meat and there would be very little left of it by spring.

If you don't mind my asking, exactly how many deer were you able to shoot to donate to the food pantry this year? I think that's really great that you do that by the way.
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