Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Welcome To The Wildlife Gardeners Forum! > Forum Announcements

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-09-2012, 08:06 AM   #21
Salamander
 
GonativeAlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Default

Just be careful not to plant a nesting tree in a yard infested with house sparrows, lol. Thats why I stay away from American plum. and other nesting trees the sparrows will just take it over.
GonativeAlex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2012, 09:16 AM   #22
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Jack,

Thank you so much for this post. You are quite articulate yourself. You definitely make me want to hear him speak.

I'm lucky enough to have alternate-leafed dogwood seeding itself around our property...none of which are mature trees yet--but some are of breeding age so there are some berries being produced. It is great to hear that it is so high on his list.

I do have wild black cherry as well...quite a few and one oak that is probably 10-15 years old...and I've added some more. I guess I'm off to a good start, but I have a LONG way to go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
After the lecture had ended, there was a question and answer period. I asked if planting shrubs and trees considered native south of one's place in anticipation of the effects of global warming was appropriate or, indeed, a good idea. He answered that, although it was a contentious issue, he felt it was. He used the example of the pipevine swallowtail, which has actually broadened its range by chasing the planting of the vine outside of it's usual range. His basic answer was that the plants had all been originally driven back from the New England area by the glaciers and had once been indigenous here. Now they will be pushed back up with global warming.
Great question! That same question has been percolating in the back of my mind for a while now. I really do want to keep locally native plants...but I also have to wonder how far away I can get my plants from while still trying to maintain the integrity of our area. Another issue is that most sources of natives that I've found are about two hours away--one north of us and quite a few south of us. Part of me felt I should buy trees and shrubs from north of here so that they are sure to be able to handle our winters (kind of funny after the winter we just had).

I've been avoiding buying things from two hours south of us...and felt mildly uneasy when I do buy from there...perhaps that can change now. I'm still undecided, but I have much more food for thought now. Thanks.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2012, 09:21 AM   #23
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by papercarver View Post
I was left wishing his entire presentation was available on PBS. You know how they have those "TV seminars" on PBS with people like Wayne Dyer, Suze Orman and Christiane Northrup? It would be fantastic to have a program like that with Doug Tallamy...
I love the ideas that come about through conversations here...now, how do we make this happen?
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2012, 09:28 AM   #24
Pope
 
Hedgerowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia
Default

Thank you Jack for the report. I feel as though WG sent an emissary, and that we chose well. Your question was excellent, and has also been on my mind.

Dap, it is nearly impossible for me to find natives locally as well, so I try to buy from my region when I can. When I cannot do that, I try to buy from areas at least contiguous to my own that are most like my region. I realize that some WG people may not approve of this, but the alternative, for me, is to plant no natives. You and I have talked about this before, I know, but for me planting no natives is no alternative at all. I love gardening too much and I'm just not the peony type. I'm the pollinator type.
Hedgerowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2012, 09:30 AM   #25
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeWonderful View Post
Thanks so much for sharing about this! I wish I could have heard him speak, too. I'm happy that in the past year I've added 2 prunus virginiana and one prunus americana I hope that counts for something! Unfortunately, oaks just seem so BIG for small yards like mine. Are there any small oak species out there .... ? Good to hear about the dogwood, I've already been dreaming about that one and hoping to find one this year at a local nursery. Thank you jack and papercarver for reporting on this for all of us!
Quercus prinoides (Dwarf Chinkapin/Chinquapin Oak) is one that I've only recently learned about. I ordered them as bare root seedlings (among other things). I should have them by next weekend.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2012, 10:50 AM   #26
Butterfly Educator Extraordinaire
 
bridget1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ventnor City, New Jersey, USA
Default

Quote:
Posted by papercarver
I was left wishing his entire presentation was available on PBS. You know how they have those "TV seminars" on PBS with people like Wayne Dyer, Suze Orman and Christiane Northrup? It would be fantastic to have a program like that with Doug Tallamy...
I was thinking a TED conference!
__________________
"Just living is not enough," said the butterfly, "one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower." ~Hans Christian Anderson

http://mslenahan.edublogs.org/
bridget1964 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2012, 10:39 AM   #27
Grub
 
papercarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Newbury, Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I love the ideas that come about through conversations here...now, how do we make this happen?
I guess the first step is to ask everyone we each know if anyone has any contacts at PBS, or knows anyone who had produced or directed a documentary. Just like networking for a job, it can be amazing what connections your friends and family may already have, if you just ask them.

I'm going to ask everyone I know about it between now and the end of April. I'll let you know if I have any success, and I'd be happy to know if anyone at WG finds a good contact...
__________________
We can restore the biodiversity of our land the same way we destroyed it - one garden at a time.
papercarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2012, 10:41 AM   #28
Grub
 
papercarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Newbury, Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgerowe View Post
I'm just not the peony type. I'm the pollinator type.
I confess I am both the peony type (ONE - ONE peony in my front yard and it still embarrasses me how much I love it) AND the pollinator type.

Speaking of which, saw the first bumblebee of the season in my yard this weekend and some of the lowbush blueberries have juuusst started to bloom. Here we go!
__________________
We can restore the biodiversity of our land the same way we destroyed it - one garden at a time.
papercarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2012, 11:49 AM   #29
Heron
 
BeeWonderful's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Minnesota
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by papercarver View Post
Speaking of which, saw the first bumblebee of the season in my yard this weekend and some of the lowbush blueberries have juuusst started to bloom. Here we go!
Blueberries are a plant that I really wish I could grow! We LOVE to eat blueberries. Unfortunately I believe that the only place where blueberries grow in Minnesota are the bogs in the northeastern part of the state, the opposite of where I am located.
BeeWonderful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2012, 09:40 AM   #30
Grub
 
papercarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Newbury, Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeWonderful View Post
Blueberries are a plant that I really wish I could grow! We LOVE to eat blueberries. Unfortunately I believe that the only place where blueberries grow in Minnesota are the bogs in the northeastern part of the state, the opposite of where I am located.
If you have acidic soil, you can grow blueberries. Vaccinium, the blueberry family, is one of the most versatile families out there. Look them up!
__________________
We can restore the biodiversity of our land the same way we destroyed it - one garden at a time.
papercarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
10am, april, doug, doug tallamy, free, lecture, massachusetts, native plants, natives, naturalist, nature, newbury, saturday, talk, tallamy

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2