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Old 11-26-2011, 01:41 PM   #1
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Default Free bone meal for our gardens from our left over turkey carcasses?

Normally I toss our whole turkey carcass out for the rodents the day after Thanksgiving. Itís usually gone in no time flat. This year Iím thinking maybe I wonít toss it out for the rodentsÖ. Iím thinking of adding the turkey bones to the chicken bones Iíve been saving in my freezer that were left over from canning chicken and broth. I was considering simmering em all together making stock I could can then after thatÖ letting em dry out then pulverizing the bones. All plants need calcium during formation and growth for proper cell division so why not use what Iíve got instead of buying boxes of bone meal? Bones are rich in calcium and phosphorus and Iím thinking the partially used box of bone meal I bought might be my last ifÖ I can just figure out how to go about pulverizing the bones. I added some boxed bone meal that I paid $$$ for to my tomatoes and carrots last summer. Iíve been crushing egg shells and sprinkling those around plantsÖ. theyíre nothing but calcium carbonate so thatís a decent source of calcium but why not go for a twoferÖ. calcium and phosphorus by pulverizing turkey bones and tossing those around all the garden plants too? Anyone doing this? I havenít pulverized bones before but it canít be that hardÖ. can it>>>?
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Old 11-26-2011, 04:35 PM   #2
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Pressure cooking the bones will turn them into a liquid-paste!
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:25 PM   #3
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Help me out here.... what about just simmering them making stock? Couldn't I just remove em then let em dry out and take a sledge hammer to em or will they be a liquid paste from bringing em to a boil then simmering them? I wasn't planning on pressure canning the bones in with the stock.... just the stock.
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Old 11-27-2011, 05:16 PM   #4
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After you've made the stock-broth with the bones, save the liquids for canning use.
Add more water to the bones and process them until they disintegrate.
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:13 AM   #5
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Did you manage to get your bones turned into meal (via pressurizing or otherwise)?

Curious...

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Old 07-13-2012, 07:28 AM   #6
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I was able to find articles on how to make bone meal. Most say to air-dry them for 3 or 4 days, then put them in the oven any time you use it for something else, until they're brittle, and then put them in a blender or food processor.

I found one for liquid bone meal fertilizer- put them in the oven at 300 degrees for 3 hours, then use hand grinder or coffee grinder to reduce them to a powder. Bring 1/2 cup bone powder, 1 quart water and a half cup baking soda to a boil, stir til dissolved, cool to room temp.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:27 AM   #7
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I.... er uh... didn't do anything fancy. I air dried mine for about how ever long I forgot them.... probably a good month or so. Then I built a little wooden tray out of a 2x6 and a left over piece of pressboard then put a piece of burlap over the top and went at the bones with a sledge hammer. It worked well enough. I divvied up all the crushed bones then added them to my composters.
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:50 PM   #8
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The sledge hammer technique probably has the additional benefit of stress reduction.
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:33 AM   #9
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Just a slight directional turn relative to getting plant-useable calcium or calcium phosphate.

Bokashi composting more quickly dissolves bones than regular composting and (my guess here) also makes the nutrients found in bones available in the Bokashi-composted soil.

And perhaps more to the point, a video on how to make your own water-soluble calcium or calcium phosphate using roasted bones/egg shells/clam shells/shrimp shells and brewed cider vinegar. No sledge hammer required..hahaha.


I've got some calcium phosphate that will soon be ready to harvest, pictured.

This guy Bryan who made the video also has a bunch of the best and most in-depth videos covering Bokashi from soup to nuts I've found.
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Free bone meal for our gardens from our left over turkey carcasses?-7432611936_54d7c18b00_d.jpg  

Last edited by soundsgood; 07-14-2012 at 07:34 AM. Reason: Again with the embedded YouTube video issue...
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Old 07-14-2012, 09:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soundsgood View Post
No sledge hammer required...
No sledgehammer?!?!?! What's the fun it that? (wink)
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