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Old 03-15-2015, 09:22 AM   #41
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Over the winter a lot of my cardboard on the front lawn disintegrated and blew all over the place. There're little bits of cardboard all over the place, along with candy bar wrappers (I don't eat candy bars}, WaWa Market containers and bags (I rarely go to a WaWa) pieces of insulation and bits of wood and constructions materials from the houses being raised all around me, and a couple of days ago two discarded doggy poop baggies, full of doggy poop (I don't even have a dog).

I'll start worrying what my neighbors can see after I see evidence that they're concerned about I can see.
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Old 03-15-2015, 10:10 AM   #42
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Over the winter a lot of my cardboard on the front lawn and blew all over the place. There're little bits of cardboard all over the place, along with candy bar wrappers (I don't eat candy bars}, WaWa Market containers and bags (I rarely go to a WaWa) pieces of insulation and bits of wood and constructions materials from the houses being raised all around me, and a couple of days ago two discarded doggy poop baggies, full of doggy poop (I don't even have a dog).

I'll start worrying what my neighbors can see after I see evidence that they're concerned about I can see.
I can certainly understand that, Arey! Fortunately, our neighbors are mostly considerate folks so I try to be as well. I live on a regular old city street and none of them have complained about my unconventional landscaping (yet). Most of it is in the back yard so far...but I'm slowly working my way out to the front. I hope if I take change things little by little - less grass, more plants - it won't be such a shock. Don't need any complaints to "The City" about my lack of lawn!
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Old 03-15-2015, 05:29 PM   #43
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Over the winter a lot of my cardboard on the front lawn disintegrated and blew all over the place. There're little bits of cardboard all over the place, along with candy bar wrappers (I don't eat candy bars}, WaWa Market containers and bags (I rarely go to a WaWa) pieces of insulation and bits of wood and constructions materials from the houses being raised all around me, and a couple of days ago two discarded doggy poop baggies, full of doggy poop (I don't even have a dog).

I'll start worrying what my neighbors can see after I see evidence that they're concerned about I can see.
That is terrible, Arey!

I don't blame you at all. I live near a somewhat busy road, and sometimes get some litter...thankfully not much and and not too often. I did read somewhere that if people see litter, they are more likely to litter in the same spot, so I always clean it up...and try to mow a narrow strip near the road so it is clearly taken care of.

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I can certainly understand that, Arey! Fortunately, our neighbors are mostly considerate folks so I try to be as well. I live on a regular old city street and none of them have complained about my unconventional landscaping (yet). Most of it is in the back yard so far...but I'm slowly working my way out to the front. I hope if I take change things little by little - less grass, more plants - it won't be such a shock. Don't need any complaints to "The City" about my lack of lawn!
Luckily, I'm not in suburban area...but I like your idea of gradual change.

Here's hoping more people appreciate the enhanced beauty.
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Old 03-26-2015, 07:57 AM   #44
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I think there is a learning curve for us all, and I thank Wildlife Gardeners having given us a forum to exchange exciting ideas.

Just as diverse as plants may be, as diverse as bugs, diverse as weather conditions, diverse as regions, each of us has to determine what works well personally in our own little niche.

So we share the results, and are reassured by the accomplishments and by the disappointments, albeit the disappointments sometimes leave us scratching our head.

Nature is awesome like that, working with it or against it, but being a part of it brings joy.

What I have learned is that if I see a comely plant, a woods sunflower for example, and I love the joy it brings me, there where I find it growing, I should consider how long has it been there, will it return for the future enjoyment? And just as I think I have the woods sunflower's natural conditions 'all figured out'. Nature throws in a surprize! I found a careless woods sunflower growing in my vegetable garden last year, and it was thriving with limbs and many blooms, growing much differently than the natives.

I concluded that my hard white-ish clay gravel hillside will grow woods sunflower just fine on it's own, but the plant also thrives in dark, rich gravelly garden dirt. So for the woods sunflower example, they are able to live well in the hard, hot, dry edges of the roadside, with less weeds competing for the same place, because of the lack of soil improvement.

It sure is fun being a wildlife gardener, now if I can just figure out what suits the various niches, and what I'm able to do within them, then my next little project shall go forth.

ww

ps to havalotta, I had same result with no carrots! I've not yet got the carrots to make in my garden even tho I've tried twice, but I was able to get the radishes, and this year, I'm trying potatoes...just for fun. I'm hoping the ground has improved with time & amendments.
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Old 03-26-2015, 10:05 PM   #45
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... I thank Wildlife Gardeners having given us a forum to exchange exciting ideas.
:
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:17 PM   #46
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I may not be on as much as I once was (Daily hourly whatever) but I still enjoy the sharing and the comradery of exchanging various ideas with one another.

I've been spending a lot of time getting caught up at the homefront before Spring arrives.... Beyond the upcoming inevitable clean up, planting and weeding I will then probably move on to creating and doing a lot of outdoor projects at both of the new camps. Creating those personal outdoor areas for rest...(What's that ?) Planting more trees and florals to soften and please the view. I imagine a few basic veggies going for fresh salads and the like....

As far as amending the soil.
I'll be working in and or topping off the areas with chopped leaves and debris hoping to keep the weeds at bay so hopefully I won't be driven to weed weed and weed. I've plenty (if not too much of that) to do already at the home-front!
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Old 03-28-2015, 12:18 PM   #47
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Here is an example of Rudbeckia that was growing in about the most hostile SW corner of the house, the house construction dirt is just plain ole' rock & clay, with no amendment in the last 25 years, albeit the dirt seems to have some organic matter within it.Amending soil vs. harming soil dwellers-100_2161.jpg

And we get volunteers about this time in spring, which can be easily transplanted while very small. Amending soil vs. harming soil dwellers-march2015-001.jpgWhen I transplant some of these little guys, they would be lucky to get compost rich amendment, but since I've got to dig a hole to transplant them into, the ground forgives a bit of disturbance. Amending soil vs. harming soil dwellers-march2015-002.jpgI think I'll transplant some of these today, off to the driveway ditch they shall go & show!

ww
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