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Old 09-09-2009, 05:37 PM  
NEBogger
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Default Saga of a new Bogger

SAGA OF A NEW BOGGER

Ever have an idea of something you'd like to try - Click here to read the entire garden article
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  #40  
By tineckbone on 04-18-2010, 07:05 AM
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I have been planning on a bog garden for a couple of years now. Mary (Bridget1964) told me that I should read this thread before I start digging. I am glad that she did because I am more confident now. I live near the Pine Barrens region, near as in the very northern-most end of it. We have been to a place called Pakim Pond that is a natural bog. It is about 10 minutes from the house. The soil and plant matter here are perfect for a bog. When I dug up the ground for my pond, it was about 99.99% sand. I have plenty of pine needles and oak leaves. I also have the perfect place for it, right behind my pond. I was planning on a much larger version than yours though because I was thinking of bordering the outside with cattails. once I start on my bog garden I will post pictures. Thanks for all the insight and inspiration!
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  #41  
By Staff on 04-18-2010, 09:30 AM
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Peat Quality and CP Horticulture (Washing media) by Tamlin Dawnstar
TerraForums

Peat Quality and CP Horticulture (Washing media) by Tamlin Dawnstar [Archive] - Terra Forums Carnivorous Plant Discussions
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If the nutrient content is high, then those anaerobic organisms present in the peat will proliferate, especially in compacted and overly wet mixes. *They begin to do their work of breaking down the peat, fixing carbonates and nitrates which is a function of cyanobacteria. *Initially, plant growth may be normal in such a mix, but as the process continues, nutrient salts accumulate over time. *Algae can proliferate using these nutrients, producing the agar that is a perfect substrate for fungal colonization. *Once a mix becomes this rich, fungus gnats can infect the pot, and root nematodes can also proliferate. *It is a gradual downhill slide. *In my own and others experience, such infected pots the plants never thrive, although they may persist.

I found more support for my theory in another long-term grower who also arrived at this same observation in the course of his own experience with growing these plants. *This is the protocol we are using. *We no longer test our peat, but follow this protocol in all instances.

Fill a five gallon bucket halfway with peat. *Cover this with pure water, and break the peat as much as possible by hand kneading it beneath the surface. *Allow the bucket to stand for 1 week. *Then squeeze a double handful of the now wet peat into a ball, and squeeze the water out. * Place the ball into another bucket, and repeat until you have a quantity sufficient to your needs. *You canít make too much!

Since the initial runoff water showed so high a reading, in some instances ten times the recommended limit, it was decided to perform the rinsing twice. *This put the runoff water reading closer to 30 PPM, much more acceptable!

Sand and perlite is also treated the same, and is rinsed until the water runs clear...
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  #42  
By stapleton on 04-18-2010, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Staff View Post
Peat Quality and CP Horticulture (Washing media) by Tamlin Dawnstar
TerraForums

Peat Quality and CP Horticulture (Washing media) by Tamlin Dawnstar [Archive] - Terra Forums Carnivorous Plant Discussions
excerpt from above:
So I take it you mean those bogs I saw at the native botanical garden are headed for trouble just like mine, but the volunteers there just don't know it yet. Your post makes sense...better safe then sorry. If I try to make another bog, I'd rather wash all the sand and peat then watch it slowly die over the years. thanks for the link!
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  #43  
By bridget1964 on 04-20-2010, 08:02 PM
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I am not as confident as John about building a bog. It really sounds like more work than he has time for! Sorry, honey! Just my honest opinion.
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  #44  
By Staff on 04-20-2010, 08:34 PM
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So I take it you mean those bogs I saw at the native botanical garden are headed for trouble just like mine...
stapleton: No one on staff has a bog. One of us searched for information to help you make a decision. That post ended up in our queue. It does seem logical. We'll cross our fingers for boggers having start up trouble.
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  #45  
By NEBogger on 04-21-2010, 05:33 PM
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Time will tell all. Certainly hoping the best for all of us!
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  #46  
By Equilibrium on 04-21-2010, 09:53 PM
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Hey!!! I know Tamlin. He's a honey. He lives in NY and he shares plants. He's right but.... he's not growing Sarracenia but probably tropical Drosera and my bet is mostly pygmy Drosera. He's not into Sarracenia unless he changed his tastes in plants drastically in the last couple of years and the article didn't say what he was growing.... you'd have to know him to know he's pretty much only into Drosera just like I'm pretty much only into growing native temperates. My suggestion would be to stick to using only Canadian sphagnum peat when starting a bog. I never rinse my peat. If I was using peat from other locations, I would have to rinse it but.... think of the logistics of rinsing peat 2x in 5-gallon buckets for a 1000 gallon bog.... uh huh... no way... I'd never do it. Seriously>>> watch the type of sphagnum peat you buy, use only distilled or rain water, and rinse your sand until the water you're rinsing it in runs clear, and everyone should be fine for Sarracenia and temperate species Drosera. You'll all test out under 100 PPMs if you want to check.
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  #47  
By NEBogger on 04-22-2010, 08:20 PM
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I never did buy a TDS meter. Think about it every so often, more so just out of curiosity.
Equil, I must say that your post does make me feel better. Thanks
Tineckbone, go for it!
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  #48  
By Equilibrium on 04-23-2010, 12:54 AM
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You don't need a TDS meter. You're fine!!!! Bank the money you save not buying one. I think tineckbone should go for it too... once he goes "soggy" he'll never go back. One comment.... cattails are too aggressive for CPs but there's some nice sedges that would look beautiful companion planted with them. stapleton> if you're talking about the Atlanta Botanical Garden they probably had Brooks Garcia steering them... he's forgotten more than I know about Sarracenia. They probably used all the "right stuff" since he's really anal and he's probably still sitting on one of their boards. And don't be giving up on your plants. They can hang out in pots well enough. That'll buy you time to rinse what you've got or start another bog or you can enjoy them in the pots indefinitely. Lots of people grow Sarracenia in pots exclusively because they don't have a yard and they do a bang up job on a balcony or patio. This kind of thing happens. I've done FAR worse and don't be fretting about the plants.... I can share some with you to get you jump started if you lose yours and I know Brooks. He's a good sport and he could be asked to set some seed aside for you and you'd get some good old fashioned hand holding out of him. He's very nurturing.
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  #49  
By tineckbone on 04-23-2010, 03:39 AM
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Bridget1964 is right, I don't have a lot of time right now. I know that there is no way for me to get a bog in this season, maybe around the end of the year. She just scared of all the work that I would have to do :P
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Tags
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