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Old 08-07-2014, 08:20 PM   #141
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My theory is they go for red flowers because they are consistent in high quality nectar and other nectar feeders can't see red, so the nectar is plentiful. Also how visible red is helps if you can see it.
Interesting.

I just re-read that...I thought it was "a theory", you say it is your theory...cool--I didn't realize other nectar feeders can't see red, where did you find that out?

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Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
From the red flowers, I see them go for other flowers (cup plant, swamp milkweed) that are in the area. Having a red flower for all seasons will keep them coming to the yard and they might browse around.
I knew they didn't go exclusively to red flowers...but I wasn't aware that they go to cup plant--great to hear, especially since I added one, really like it, and plan to grow more.

-----
Great shot of a hummer you got there--I like the feel of secretly looking in at its world (love the fact the viewer looks through leaves to see the focus of the photo).
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Old 08-07-2014, 08:27 PM   #142
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Birds can see red (berries), but not sure of the range. Hummingbird being a bird can see red too. Bees can't see red. Butterflies can kinda see red.

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The visible spectrum of a bee is shifted when compared to the visible spectrum of a human. The visible spectrum, for a human with normal vision, stretches from 800 mu to 400 mu. The visible spectrum, for a bee, stretches from 650 mu to 300 mu. This means that the visible spectrum for bees is shifted to shorter wavelengths. The visible spectrum is “shortened for the bees in the red, but it is extended into the ultraviolet,” a color that a human with normal vision can not see (Frisch 9). The major difference between the color sense of a bee and a human is that the “human eye can distinguish about sixty distinct colors in the visible spectrum, while the bee can distinguish only four different colors in the visible spectrum: yellow, blue-green, blue, and ultraviolet” (Explanation) (Frisch 9).
Vision of a human compared to vision of bee

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The butterfly eye has three types of color receptors. This is termed Trichromatic vision. The human vision is also trichromatic, but there is a difference.

The butterfly color receptors can perceive colors in a high frequency (frequency is a measuring unit of color)..The lowest frequency of color is red. The butterfly cannot pick up lower frequencies, and obviously blind to red. Man cannot detect higher frequency colors beyond violet, and therefore blind to ultraviolet.
Butterfly UV Vision
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Old 08-08-2014, 11:20 PM   #143
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Birds can see red (berries), but not sure of the range. Hummingbird being a bird can see red too. Bees can't see red. Butterflies can kinda see red...
Thanks, rockerBOO. I'm always learning.

I think I have a photo I took of a yellow swallowtail at a red cardinal flower...but I can't remember and am not gonna search now.

I'm assuming color alone is not always what draws things to flowers, am I correct?
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Old 08-09-2014, 10:52 AM   #144
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I see swallowtails and sulphurs at my Lobelia cardinalis, so I am sur you were right, dap.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:54 PM   #145
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When red isn't visible, it is like a dark gray/black. Smelling may be important, and I believe they smell through their feet. I think they can see Red though, just maybe not the whole range of red. Also some butterflies may be able to see more colors than others.
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Old 08-09-2014, 02:01 PM   #146
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It uses color vision when searching for food, and is sensitive to UV, violet, blue, green, and red wavelength peaks, suggesting color constancy. In nature, these butterflies feed on nectar provided by flowers of various colors not only in direct sunlight, but also in shaded places and on cloudy days.
Butterflies | Causes of Color

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Do animals see the world and each other as we humans see them? Do they even see in the same visible spectrum? Is animal eye structure similar to human eye structure? What colors are attractive to different species? How does coloration influence an animal choosing a mate? How do common pets, such as dogs and cats view the world? Are blue-eyed cats always deaf? Do dogs eyes contain more rods or cones? Which species has the broadest spectrum of color vision in the animal kingdom?
Vision in Birds, Butterflies, Cats, and Dogs

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Humans are trichromats, meaning that we experience color through three types of photoreceptors tuned to different wavelengths: short (blue), medium (green), and long (red); and the combinations of activity of these receptors give us the perception of color. However, it turns out that the tuning curve of the red receptor in bees is shifted up such that they are red-blind, but see ultraviolet light. This means that UV light is their version of red (try to imagine). That change in color gives nature another way to evolve its marketing campaign and attract more business. For instance, flowers have evolved to provide bright UV petals surrounding a dark region contrasting containing glowing UV pollen. Although we can't see it, bees must find this irresistible!
Invisible Colors | The Artful Brain | Learn Science at Scitable
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Old 08-09-2014, 09:37 PM   #147
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Thanks turttle.

And thanks for more quotes, rockerBOO.

I remember seeing a thread a while back with a link showing what flowers looked
Ike to bees--very different than what we see.
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