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Old 02-09-2011, 11:31 AM   #11
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A question for which the answer is moot, for what man can do he will do, here goes.

With what we are learning about biodiversity and the complexity of ecosystem functions do you think that genetically modifying such huge monocultures as cash crops will ultimately have no adverse affects?
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Old 02-11-2011, 12:32 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
A question for which the answer is moot, for what man can do he will do, here goes.

With what we are learning about biodiversity and the complexity of ecosystem functions do you think that genetically modifying such huge monocultures as cash crops will ultimately have no adverse affects?

Hey Gloria,

I guess the answer is moot !
And clearly the best anyone is going to be able to do is make guesses.

Also, the answer is not going to be the same for all cases.

My guess would be that not a whole lot will be changed compared with now.

My reasoning would be, we already are running these huge monocultures. They exist and they are, to varying degrees, damaging. I would say that these monocultures are already GMOs, just they were modified outside the lab. Most of our modifications are pretty useless to the plant's viability in the wild, since they are almost all "be bigger, and more puny".
The usual defn of a GMO is something whose genetics are modified in a "lab" (however lab is defined).
Let's say some allele, or some gene is introduced (in the dreaded lab) which sweeps the wild population of the cashcrop, well, in this case the fact that it is large and a monoculture to start out with doesn't matter. The gene is wild now, and there is nothing anyone can do.

I would tend to say that such GMO monocultures would probably be slightly beneficial since there may be less third party intervention to keep the crop alive. (Ie addition of petrochems, and so on.)

Like I said though, all guesses
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