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Old 01-28-2009, 07:33 AM   #31
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You could also use some of those nifty seed envelopes our wonderful bearlady has been producing for the site. Those will easily contain the seeds, especially the small ones. You can include a personal note along with directions on use I would think. It's a thoughtful idea.
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Old 01-29-2009, 02:26 AM   #32
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I planted native plants in my front yard one plant at a time. It looked pretty danged good last year. This is the lower part of the driveway garden, around July 4. The upper part looked good, too, but I couldn't fit it into one picture.

The thing is to start small, and work your way up.

I do have non-native plants in there...but they are well behaved ones. I have german bearded irises and a tree peony. Since we have a problem with Iris root borer around here, that may have been my last year of fighting that fight, and I will give up my dreams of a German Bearded Iris patch, LOL!

There is also a cultivar...Rudbeckia 'Prairie Sun.' I highly recommend it. It's a biennial that blooms from mid-June 'til August.

The grasses in the bottom center are little blue stem and side oats grama. They have wonderful seed heads, and turn a really nice coral/salmon colour in the fall. If you're doing native plants...the grasses are important, too. Prairie dropseed is an excellent, graceful, short grass.
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Old 01-29-2009, 11:07 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
I've made my own custom seed mixes to give away before. I used stamp envelopes. There are some neat ideas out there to use native seed to make party favors for bridal showers. I'll try to find the notes I saved on them.
Thanks Lorax, that would be great!

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You could also use some of those nifty seed envelopes our wonderful bearlady has been producing for the site. Those will easily contain the seeds, especially the small ones. You can include a personal note along with directions on use I would think. It's a thoughtful idea.
How did I forget? I will edit my project as soon as I am feeling less like the living dead. . . *Stolon needs more coffee*

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The grasses in the bottom center are little blue stem and side oats grama. They have wonderful seed heads, and turn a really nice coral/salmon colour in the fall. If you're doing native plants...the grasses are important, too. Prairie dropseed is an excellent, graceful, short grass.
Hi Prarie! What lovely flowers you've got. Would you be interested in writing up a how-to for a native grasses bed?
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Old 01-29-2009, 05:57 PM   #34
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Your posey patch is just precious!
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Old 02-02-2009, 05:31 PM   #35
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Default A Rain-Barrel for Beginners

A great way to conserve water is to put a rain-barrel under a down-spout from your house. But if the cost of a rain barrel is too much for you at the moment, try a simpler solution: a five-gallon bucket.

You can buy a five-gallon buckets at your local hardware store. Or try asking at a local sandwich shop if they have any buckets that they are going to throw away. Such a bucket may smell like pickles for a while but it will get the job done.

Just position the bucket under a down-spout and wait for rain. Or, better yet, put it under a spout where your air-conditioner drips. You will be amazed at how quickly your bucket fills in hot weather.

If you cut off the top of a plastic gallon milk-jug, you can use that to scoop out water either straight onto plants, or to pour into a watering can.

Birds and other wildlife will appreciate the water-source. Note, however, that a partially-filled bucket can become a trap for small critters, such as chipmunks. As a precaution, leave a stick in the bucket, to give small animals something to use as a ladder should they fall in.

As long as you empty the bucket every so often, you should have no problems with mosquitoes.

Happy water conservation!
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Old 02-02-2009, 08:09 PM   #36
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If you're still wanting some info on a butterfly garden I found this site from umass that you might like.

http://www.umass.edu/umext/mac/Newsletters/spring2002.htm#Butterfly%20Garden%20Resources
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:20 PM   #37
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Hi Maggy! Actually what I want are instructions for simple projects that are in the spirit of these forums, that we can use to welcome newcomers with.

Thanks though. You could start a new thread with that info!
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:39 PM   #38
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Anything entrylevel for seniors and disabled?
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:48 PM   #39
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Anything entrylevel for seniors and disabled?
Are you looking for projects, or offering to contribute some? Either is great, but so far our project list is very short! Care to add some?
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Old 02-03-2009, 10:46 PM   #40
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Ummm, I can help with a few projects for seniors and disabled. What do you have in mind?
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