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Old 01-26-2009, 09:33 PM   #21
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That's a great example of something we could aim for! Thank you.

Do you have photos of your yard up somewhere? I would LOVE to see it!
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Old 01-27-2009, 06:13 AM   #22
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Stoloniferous, I like your idea of aiming at suburban/urban gardeners and helping them make their gardens easy, beautiful and environmentally sound so they are useful to native insects and by extension local creatures.


Since I've been trying to achieve that goal myself over the years I can tell you what I've been searching for for years; a book that contains beautiful photos of native plants that belong in my area and will work together in my garden.

If each of us who are gardening this way shares the information and photos of what has worked in our gardens we will have the beginnings of a guide for the whole country.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:18 AM   #23
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Do you have photos of your yard up somewhere? I would LOVE to see it!
No, I don't have photos of my yard, and no, it's not pretty. I would bring flowers to share each day at work and people would say "you must have a beautiful garden". No, I just happen to have pretty flowers stuck here and there among the weeds.

Working on that though. If I ever have anything picture-worthy, I'll post it!

Your place however, has serious thought and planning and will be nice from day one, and impressive after year 2 or 3.
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Old 01-27-2009, 10:39 AM   #24
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a book that contains beautiful photos of native plants that belong in my area and will work together in my garden.

Its not a book, but one of my favorite places to look at pictures of native plants is the Prairie Nursery catalog. Even if you don't order from them, its a great reference to have for pictures, bloom times, plant descriptions. Its not comprehensive, but they have a lot of good reference material in their catalog and on their website.

I have an ugly yard too. Well not really...the immature plantings are nothing much to look at... but hopefully my butterfly garden will be picture worthy next year. Though I do think it would be good to put together a picture of the plantings in their immature state and then in their mature state. So people know what to expect and they aren't disappointed in that first year. I do plan to work something like this up...year one picture, followed by year two picture, followed by a year three picture... I think that might be helpful.

Here is a few pictures of plantings in various stages...

the first is the rain garden in early spring
the second is the very beginnings of a rain garden
the second is a prairie island
the last is a woodland edge
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Old 01-27-2009, 11:12 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by will-o-wisp View Post
Stoloniferous, I like your idea of aiming at suburban/urban gardeners and helping them make their gardens easy, beautiful and environmentally sound so they are useful to native insects and by extension local creatures.


Since I've been trying to achieve that goal myself over the years I can tell you what I've been searching for for years; a book that contains beautiful photos of native plants that belong in my area and will work together in my garden.

If each of us who are gardening this way shares the information and photos of what has worked in our gardens we will have the beginnings of a guide for the whole country.
Thank you! I hope you can use what you have learned over the years to suggest a few projects!

I'm still so new to all of this that I could use some project ideas, myself. I need to wait a few years to see how my current projects pan out!
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Old 01-27-2009, 11:14 AM   #26
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No, I don't have photos of my yard, and no, it's not pretty. I would bring flowers to share each day at work and people would say "you must have a beautiful garden". No, I just happen to have pretty flowers stuck here and there among the weeds.

Working on that though. If I ever have anything picture-worthy, I'll post it!

Your place however, has serious thought and planning and will be nice from day one, and impressive after year 2 or 3.
Why, thanks! My yard is greatly improved by careful angling of a camera, by the way. I'm sure yours has its photogenic angles, too! (And even if it doesn't, I would still love to see it! Perhaps you could start a thread in the landscaping and gardens section documenting your progress?)
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Old 01-27-2009, 11:17 AM   #27
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Its not a book, but one of my favorite places to look at pictures of native plants is the Prairie Nursery catalog.
Ooh, thanks for sharing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joepyeweed View Post
Though I do think it would be good to put together a picture of the plantings in their immature state and then in their mature state. So people know what to expect and they aren't disappointed in that first year. I do plan to work something like this up...year one picture, followed by year two picture, followed by a year three picture... I think that might be helpful.
What a wonderful idea! I hope you will do that!
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Old 01-27-2009, 12:47 PM   #28
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Something to keep reminding both yourself and beginners when dealing with newly planted perennials especially.

The first year they sleep.
The second year they creep.
The third year they leap!
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There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling. ~Mirabel Osler

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Old 01-27-2009, 02:33 PM   #29
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Default Giving Wildflower Seeds as Gifts

If you are ever in need of an inexpensive, personalized gift for a lot of people, such as wedding favors, or a little something to tuck into your many Christmas cards, consider giving a custom native seed mix.

Commercial “wildflower” seed mixes are often made up of non-native species, and sometimes contain varieties of plants that are invasive or illegal to plant in certain states. So, native seeds are a gift that is friendly to the environment.

You can make your own native seed mix by ordering individual seed types from a native-plant nursery. I like
Easy Wild Flowers because you can order seed by the ounce, and because they show where each plant is native, by state.

Here is an example of a seed mix for a full-sun flower garden that would be appropriate across much of the continental US:

Lupine (Lupinus perennis)
Prairie Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya)
Lemon Mint (Monarda citriodora)
Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana)
Scarlet Sage (Salvia coccinea)
Prairie Onion (Allium stellatum)
Yellow coneflower (Echinacea paradoxa)
Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa)

Once you have your seeds, you will need to divide them up into paper envelopes, or some other sort of container. For this, I have used generic thank-you-card-sized envelopes. These can be purchased at any stationary store. (Do note that the corners of the envelope need to be taped so that the seeds don’t fall out, however.)

You can write on or decorate your seed envelopes however you like. Though do be sure to do so before adding the seeds, because it is hard to write on a lumpy envelope!

To make your seed pack look nice, try this: print out a description of the seeds and planting instructions. Fold up these instructions, and attach them to the envelope with a sticker.

Enjoy!
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Old 01-28-2009, 12:31 AM   #30
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I've made my own custom seed mixes to give away before. I used stamp envelopes. There are some neat ideas out there to use native seed to make party favors for bridal showers. I'll try to find the notes I saved on them.
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