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Old 07-30-2010, 10:17 PM   #11
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Gentlemen, start your engines - or get a clue!
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Old 07-31-2010, 07:48 AM   #12
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I would say you should include city ordinances that restrict (or promote) the kinds of landscaping you can use. The space under power lines is a special consideration. Our city specifies that you have to have a lawn in the space between your house and the street and you have to mow it.

Beyond that using trees and shrubs to protect your self from traffic noises and pollution.

In our town the city owns the front 10 ft of your property and they feel free to douse it with herbicides no matter how much you have paid for your shrubs and considered what you want your landscape to be.
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:33 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post
Now that gives me an idea that might be neat... I could collect twig samples from all the invasives right in the immediate area, staple them to the sheets, and label them. That would give people a little head start.
I'm wondering if scanning them and printing them would keep them looking fresh and not wilted.
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:35 PM   #14
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... A little sign with "these are a butterfly magnet" or a photo with some butterflies on it might be an attention getter. A lot of people like to attract butterflies. Nice easy way to equate native plants with nature.
I love that idea! If I ever get around to making a sign or signs for my property, I'll keep that in mind.
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:39 PM   #15
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One specific source for an attention getting quote is Douglas Tallamy's Bringing Nature Home:
"If you count all of the terrestrial bird species in North America that rely on insects and other arthropods (typically, the spiders that eat insects) to feed their young, you would find that figure to be about 96 percent (Dickinson 1999) - in other words, nearly all of them." [page 21 - 22 of the updated and expanded edition]. Who doesn't want to be good to baby birds?

Another book that might provide some attention worthy quotes is Sara Stein's book Noah's Garden. Using quotes from books like these also gives you the opportunity to introduce some excellent books.
I'm going to keep in mind the insects/arthropods as food for baby birds, as another example of why to include natives.

Quotes from these books will hopefully stick with people AND make them want to read them too.
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:40 PM   #16
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A big advantage of native plants for me is spending less time on yard work, especially mowing. A few facts about how much gasoline is used and air pollution is caused by lawn mowers every weekend would be good...
Yes, let's give people a good excuse to be lazy and mow less!
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Old 08-01-2010, 09:11 PM   #17
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Yes, let's give people a good excuse to be lazy and mow less!
(giggle) I could not agree more.
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:06 PM   #18
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I can't figure out how to phrase it. This is the best I came up with without taxing my brain too much: Did you know that you can add color, interest, and life to your garden by planting native plants that attract birds and butterflies?

Or: Add life to your garden. Birds and butterflies add color and interest to the garden.

....maybe once people decide they would love to see more birds and butterflies, they may be more open to the "attracting insects for birds to feed to their young" thing.
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:08 PM   #19
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(giggle) I could not agree more.
~smile~ I have moments of great motivation and other moments of laziness--I think this busy world makes "lazy gardening" appealing.
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Old 08-02-2010, 09:20 PM   #20
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OK, here's what I've got so far:

Did You Know?
1) "If you count all of the terrestrial bird species in North America that rely on insects and other arthropods (typically, the spiders that eat insects) to feed their young, you would find that figure to be about 96 percent (Dickinson 1999) -- in other words, nearly all of them."(Douglas Tallamy, Bringing Nature Home, pp. 21-22)
2) When plant genera are ranked by the number of native caterpillar species they feed, 19 of the top 20 are native plants. (Lepidopteran Ornamental Guide, Welcome to the Lepidopteran Ornamental Guide!)
3) Turfgrass in the U.S. takes up 46.5 million acres, a land mass greater than that of Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Rhode Island combined. (The Lawn Institute, FAQs-Interesting Facts About Turfgrass)
4) The most aggressive terrestrial invasive plant species in Western NY are common and glossy buckthorn, multiflora rose, Asian shrub honeysuckles, garlic mustard, Phragmites, Japanese knotweed, and Japanese and European barberry. Find out more at invasive.org and nps.gov/plants.
5) Compostable yard trimmings and food residuals constitute 26% of the U.S. municipal solid waste stream. (EPA, Composting | Reduce, Reuse, Recycle | US EPA)
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