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Old 12-14-2009, 11:14 AM   #11
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Those are the places that produce the most amount of food waste and will make the most real impact anyway.
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Old 12-14-2009, 12:09 PM   #12
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dragonfly01 About charging for scraps

Out here, they charge by the ton, not the dumpster, for whatever is landfilled. And, they want it separated. Cardboard does not go in with 'kitchen wastes', for example. It has to be broken down & tied or boxed & set alongside the dumpster. Or in a separate dumpster. Same goes for newspapers, slick paper, & so on.

Woe betides the dumper who has 'kitchen wastes' in with their bottles, cans, & old sofas & the dump operators find out.. The fines aren't hefty enough, maybe, yet, but they will get your attention.. and the municipalities will always raise them if 'the people' push for it.. We're talking about the very backward Dakota Territory here, so I am suprised to learn that larger-population areas aren't pushing the recycling harder.
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Old 12-15-2009, 12:51 AM   #13
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Well... I guess the very backward Dakota Territory isn't that backward compared to us ding dongs that can't get it through our heads the landfills are filling up. One thing lots of us do do with furniture is we put out anything that's good the day before so garbage day scavengers get it before the trucks do. I've put out computer desks and shelving units that were too big to take to Good Will and they always go. We put out a very heavy tv that worked good and taped the remote to the front of it and that went too.
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Old 12-15-2009, 04:56 PM   #14
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Default Here's the dirt on how to compost

Here's the dirt on how to compost
by Ashley Tate and Sharon Tanenbaum

Here's the dirt on how to compost - CNN.com
excerpt from above:
Quote:
Start adding waste in a ratio of three "browns" to one "green."
Browns are carbon-rich materials and include wood chips, straw, branches, and leaves.

Greens provide nitrogen and include grass clippings and kitchen scraps, like eggshells and carrot tops.

When you're adding new material, Oshins suggests, dig a hole in the pile and stir the new stuff in so it gets coated with the old mixture.
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Old 12-15-2009, 09:55 PM   #15
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This thread might be of interest-
Compost: Greens, Browns, and Misc
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Old 01-16-2017, 12:10 PM   #16
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This composting system states that it takes only 24 hours to turn kitchen scraps into compost!
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/z...recycling--2#/
Has anyone tried this model?
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Old 01-16-2017, 09:41 PM   #17
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This composting system states that it takes only 24 hours to turn kitchen scraps into compost!
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/z...recycling--2#/
Has anyone tried this model?
I'm not sure if it's available yet. Looks like a fundraising campaign to help get it into production.

With our mostly plant-based diet, I'd probably need about three of these in my kitchen! I don't mind composting the old fashioned way, but I have room to do that. This might be handy for people who don't have the space for traditional composting.
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Old 01-17-2017, 09:34 AM   #18
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I'm not sure if it's available yet. Looks like a fundraising campaign to help get it into production.

With our mostly plant-based diet, I'd probably need about three of these in my kitchen! I don't mind composting the old fashioned way, but I have room to do that. This might be handy for people who don't have the space for traditional composting.
Looks great. As a vegan, I don't accumulate as much trash as I once did, and when I was living in Mass year round, I had a worm bin in the cellar that I fed all of my food scraps to, not having any meat in the house to start with.

As I spend my winters in Florida now, I've given up my worm bin. Now I go out into the yard, dig a rather shallow hole, and dump from a bucket with a lid, the recent week's food scraps. In a way, I still have the worm bin, but the worms are free roaming in the yard

I did enjoy having the worms in the cellar, however. I had a nice canvas bag set up that hung from supporting bars that had a draw string on the bottom of the bag. Any excess moisture dripped through the hole in the bottom into a bucket I had there, but the worms never penetrated that deep, as there was no need to - all of the food was placed on the top, and that was where they mostly hung out!

Best of all, it was completely odor free. I miss that...
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Old 01-17-2017, 12:00 PM   #19
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I have a very small composting bucket upon my counter top. I'd say it's close to gallon size. Hubby doesn't eat many veggies and I choose to eat a lot of their skins. Potatoes and carrots inclusive as I like the flavor and nutrients they add. My son even eats the fuzzy kiwi skins!!!

I used to have a vermiculture under the sink. Almost lost them when I added a cedar sprig to the mix from a bouquet I had inside. Cedar oils were to blame! I gathered up the lot that had moved to the other side of the bin and tossed the rest to the compost pile. About a year later, I noticed they had all ran away! To where? I never did figure that one out. They certainly didn't die in the mix as you would have definitely noticed their decay. Not a worm to be found....How strange was that !!!
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Old 01-17-2017, 02:00 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
Looks great. As a vegan, I don't accumulate as much trash as I once did, and when I was living in Mass year round, I had a worm bin in the cellar that I fed all of my food scraps to, not having any meat in the house to start with.

As I spend my winters in Florida now, I've given up my worm bin. Now I go out into the yard, dig a rather shallow hole, and dump from a bucket with a lid, the recent week's food scraps. In a way, I still have the worm bin, but the worms are free roaming in the yard

I did enjoy having the worms in the cellar, however. I had a nice canvas bag set up that hung from supporting bars that had a draw string on the bottom of the bag. Any excess moisture dripped through the hole in the bottom into a bucket I had there, but the worms never penetrated that deep, as there was no need to - all of the food was placed on the top, and that was where they mostly hung out!

Best of all, it was completely odor free. I miss that...
We are vegan as well, Jack, and don't have much trash...but we sure have lots of compost from all the veggie scraps! My daughter and her boyfriend have a worm bin in their house. They can't have a compost pile because of the bears. The worm bin is right in their kitchen. No odor at all.
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