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Old 03-28-2012, 08:00 PM   #1
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Default Plant locally native milkweeds!!!!

Monarch Watch Blog
If that’s not incentive to plant more locally native milkweeds…. I dunno what is!!! Plant as many locally native milkweeds as you can, PLANTS Profile for Asclepias (milkweed) | USDA PLANTS
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:16 PM   #2
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Here I've seen different kinds growing on roadsides, waste areas and fields. They aren't what I would call garden worthy but I usually see a whole lot of them so I figured that was a good thing. I assume these are as good as the A. tuberosa and other pretty ones for the little guys? If so, there's no shortage of host plants when they come flying through Oklahoma.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:35 PM   #3
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I have a hundred Asclepias asperulas in the front field. I think they are garden worthy. The monarchs are coming through now. I saw them on my bolting Thai rat tailed radish flowers and serching out the milkweed..
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:12 PM   #4
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I'm catching up on threads and just found this posted by Cirsium, Monarch Butterfly Habitat. It's really a good read.
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Daminita> way cool you've got 100! If they're coming through.... can ya take some photos>>>>?
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:42 PM   #5
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I have a bunch of A. tuberosa and A. incarnata in the garden. Last year I added A. purpurascens to its own spot, but I'm also germinating a bunch from seed with the intention of pairing it with A. tuberosa. Also from seed Prairie Milkweed, Asclepias sullivantii, and the shade loving Poke Milkweed, Asclepias exaltata.
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:02 AM   #6
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I have 3 plants, 3 types of milkweed. Swamp, butterfly and purple. They are still looking barely alive but hopefully soon.
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:06 PM   #7
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Wow! You all make me want to have a LOT more milkweed and a lot more varieties!

Someday, I'm sure I could have a hundred here!

I do have butterflyweed, swamp milkweed, and common milkweed...but I want more of them all and add more varieties. Thanks, everyone, for inspiring me to get more.
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:26 PM   #8
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I looked up A. purpurascens. Thats pretty! I only have tuberosa (still sleeping) and one asperula which has flower buds. The ones I see on the roadsides and are sort of scraggly, not real pretty, but interesting anyway. I think maybe A. viridiflora is one kind and maybe A. perinnis or verticillata. I had meant to try to ID them last year and forgot about it. You reminded me of it and I got my "W. C. Grimm" out to look them up.

GonativeAlex, my tuberosa takes a while to come around so maybe its just still early for them?

MrIloveTheAnts...you have a couple I am going to have to google. Never heard of them.
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savannah View Post
I looked up A. purpurascens. Thats pretty! ...

MrIloveTheAnts...you have a couple I am going to have to google. Never heard of them.
Purple Milkweed is hard to find, and this is the only source that seems to offer it regularly. I think they only do like one flat of it a year so get your order in. With other nurseries, even if it's labeled as Sold Out, CALL THEM! For whatever reason this is a well desired plant that seems to always sell out enough that nurseries don't always bother to update their sites.

Red Ringed Milkweed is another stunner but I have not been able to find it in the wild or anyone selling it. Which is a shame. As much as I love Butterfly Weed and Swamp/Red Milkweed I wish more species would take off in nurseries.
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Old 03-30-2012, 09:06 AM   #10
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Yes, it seems that the only ones in stores are the ones that like wetter soil than I have. I would love to find the A. texana. The seeds are hard to find even. They are indigenous to just the Central texas area, but I have never seen them in the wild.

My "hundreds" of asperula came with the field. They are a natural population.Savannah. If you want another one, I have a baby dug up. It was growing where I wanted to put a Salvia in.
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amplexicaulis, asclepias, asclepias purpurascens, asclepias tuberosa, butterflies, butterfly, hirtella, locally, milk weed varieties, milkweed, milkweeds, monarch, monarchs, native, plant, purpurascens, tuberosa, varity, viridiflora

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