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Old 03-30-2012, 10:00 AM   #11
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Thanks for the reminder MILTA! I just went and bought some Purple Milkweed from them, and a few other plants just happened to fall into my cart while shopping. Ooops!!!
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Old 03-30-2012, 10:39 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Damianita View Post
Yes, it seems that the only ones in stores are the ones that like wetter soil than I have. I would love to find the A. texana. The seeds are hard to find even. They are indigenous to just the Central texas area, but I have never seen them in the wild.

My "hundreds" of asperula came with the field. They are a natural population.Savannah. If you want another one, I have a baby dug up. It was growing where I wanted to put a Salvia in.
This nursery may have the A. texana available:
Natives of Texas -- White Milkweed
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Old 03-30-2012, 10:52 AM   #13
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Damianita, the A. texana grow here (I'm one county west of San Antonio). Last year was difficult for them between the drought and repeated attacks by the Swamp Milkweed Beetle (eats milkweed plant, in case you didn't know). Hoping this year will be better...could collect some seeds to send you (assuming I'm able to get any) this year. I also have Antelope Horns (A. asperula) and Mexican Milkweed (A. curassavica) Some consider Mexican Milkweed a nonnative, but considering it is native in northern Mexico...the way I look at it that's as if it grew native one state over...so it's almost native to Texas. It does bother me that no local nurseries sell any milkweed other than Mexican Milkweed. Not too long ago, I noticed some milkweed at a San Antonio nursery that were clearly labeled Asclepias tuberosa. I took one look and pointed out to an employee that it was obviously Mexican Milkweed. I've seen that happen before many times. I'm happy now, because I just found eggs on milkweed to raise. They're bound to be Monarchs, because I saw one laying eggs on it.
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Old 03-30-2012, 11:47 AM   #14
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The size of the overwintering monarch population in Mexico is usually released in late January or February.
The good news is, the population was larger by almost a hectare than expected.
The bad news is, this number represents the 4th lowest total for the monarch colonies recorded since the winter of 1994-1995.
This population represents a continuation of a trend – the 8th consecutive population below the long term average.
I followed a lead to an over Wintering area of the monarchs while in the San Francisco area a few weeks back.
Plant locally native milkweeds!!!!-dscf3832.jpg
I saw one fluttering about really high ....over here.
Plant locally native milkweeds!!!!-dscf3834.jpg
Then another.... over there.

I spotted an elderly couple with binoculars gawking into the tree tops and spoke to them about how disappointing it was that there were so few...and that I was expecting to see them hanging in droops. They were very eager to point out a specific area and began explaining.....
"The little things were resting with their wings closed...That's them....HUNDREDS of them right there! Do you see them?"
I looked up and scanned the area and this is what they were pointing out to me.
Plant locally native milkweeds!!!!-dscf3831.jpg
Poor ole farts asked me again, if I could see them. I hadn't the heart to tell them they were just seed pods they were looking at so I just agreed and said all excitedly YES! All kinds of THEM and there's sooooo many! They both gave me the broadest smiles having thought they had really helped me out. I hadn't lied, I really could see THEM it just wasn't their THEM then.
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Old 03-30-2012, 06:54 PM   #15
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Hahaha - too funny! And they made that mistake WITH binoculars.
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Old 03-30-2012, 07:07 PM   #16
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I know..... It was kind of sad but I didn't want to burst their bubble.
They were such a NICE couple.
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Old 03-30-2012, 08:34 PM   #17
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Here I've seen different kinds growing on roadsides, waste areas and fields. They aren't what I would call garden worthy but I usually see a whole lot of them so I figured that was a good thing. I assume these are as good as the A. tuberosa and other pretty ones for the little guys? If so, there's no shortage of host plants when they come flying through Oklahoma.
Why do you say they aren't garden worthy? We have dug up many common milkweed plants from the sides of roads and put them in the garden. They transplant well if you get most of the roots.

You are lucky there is a lot of milkweed in your area. I know with the drought ya'll had that a lot of the milkweed died.

I find the monarchs don't like to lay their eggs on tuberosa as much as some of the others.
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Old 03-30-2012, 08:41 PM   #18
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It is tough to find milkweeds in nurseries around here. I got excited once when I asked if they had any milkweed at a local nursery. It turned out to be tropical milkweed or A. curassavica. I won't plant it because its not native to New Jersey. I once had someone argue with me about it saying it wasn't invasive and that it didn't reseed. I told them about how I planted it one year and it came up the next three years, even though I pulled it all out!

I think we need to be careful and plant locally native, just like Lib says in her first post. (which really made me smile to see!) There are many introduced species of plants that weren't always invasive and then turn out to be nightmares!
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Old 03-30-2012, 10:34 PM   #19
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Why do you say they aren't garden worthy?
I was unclear, sorry. What I meant was, they aren't decorative like A. tuberosa and many other native plants are. They were not what I would call "showy", rather they were rather insignificant looking. When I say "garden worthy" I mean a plant that could hit the nursery trade and become a good bedding plant for sales that would appeal to buyers, inducing them to plant natives instead of other plants. I guess that was a bad choice of phrase, without an explanation.

My main reason for bringing it up was I was wondering if the monarchs maybe preferred them to something like the A. tuberosa and because they were numerous. The only reason I noticed them at all was because I was bending down and looking close at plants while walking around.

I would include any of them in a prairie setting or naturalized area. I thought they were very interesting and was glad to see so many in the wild. One kind I saw, if planted by itself, would look pretty sad and insignificant since it was just a single stem, more or less. It was seeing them in mass that made the statement and made me wonder about the monarchs.
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Old 03-31-2012, 08:29 AM   #20
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Common milkweed isn't garden worthy because it'll invade the other plants forming massive stands. I cant plant it anyway, have a hard time getting it to grow from seed and I haven't the heart to dig it from the wild.
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