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Old 03-23-2009, 01:45 PM   #11
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If I am correct the Red Maple might not be good for the very urban area where we live. But pussy willows sound like a good idea. I seem to remember them blooming very early at Lake Katherine last year. I will look into that, thanks.
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Old 04-07-2009, 08:14 PM   #12
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While attending the Tallamy presentation we got a handout of the best plants for Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). Here's the list of woody plants for the Mid-Atlantic region:

Quercus - Oaks .. 534 species of Lepidoptera supported
Prunus - Black Cherry .. 456
Salix - Willow .. 455
Betula - Birch .. 413
Populus - Poplar .. 368
Malus - Crabapple .. 311
Vaccinium - Blueberry .. 288
Acer - Maple .. 285
Ulmus - Elm .. 213
Pinus - Pine .. 203
Carya - Hickory .. 200
Crataegus - Hawthorn .. 159
Picea - Spruce .. 156
Alnus - Alder .. 156
Tilia - Basswood .. 150
Fraxinus - Ash .. 150
Rosa - Rose .. 139
Corylus - Filbert .. 131
Juglans - Walnut .. 130
Fagus - Beech .. 126
Castanea - Chestnut .. 125

By comparison, the best perennial - Solidago (Goldenrod) .. 115.
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Old 04-07-2009, 08:27 PM   #13
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Thank you so much for sharing Tallamy's list of woody plants for the Mid-Atlantic!

What a great, simple way to encourage people to plant more trees--I don't know anyone who doesn't like butterflies (though my neighbor is caterpillar-phobic).

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Old 04-08-2009, 12:01 AM   #14
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Quote:
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Early flowering trees and shrubs make up most of the nectar and pollen for early rising bees as well. I have been looking for native trees and shrubs that bloom early so that a continuous supply of food is available for the early bumbles that I have seen.
While it may not be native, it is a great fruit tree and one of the earliest blooming, that is why below a zone 7 it is risky to grow-the Apricot tree. For those who have never eaten a fresh picked apricot, it is juicy and has a sweet/tangy not tart taste. Its juicyness rivals that of many peaches. It is not like those dried up green bitter nasty things they charge an arm and leg for at the market.

But because it does bloom so early, it is risky. Any late frost/freeze will set back if not kill the fruit set. I grew them successfully for years in the Phila. PA area, and the neighbors loved the showy pink blossoms in late march early april. Beating out the the dogwoods and most other flowering trees up north year after year. I just started a couple of trees down here in TN.
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:28 AM   #15
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Quote:
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Early flowering trees and shrubs make up most of the nectar and pollen for early rising bees as well. I have been looking for native trees and shrubs that bloom early so that a continuous supply of food is available for the early bumbles that I have seen.
Spicebush spicebush spicebush (lindera benzoin). It is a "native forsythia", and every year it turns the mesic woodlands a hazy yellow color, less than a month after the ground thaws. It's very easy to identify; the leaf when ripped smells like lemon Pledge furniture wipe.

Quote from wikipedia:
Quote:
One of the world's rarest bee species, the andrenid bee Andrena lauracea, described in 1897, is known only from two female specimens, both collected on Lindera benzoin in Carlinville, Illinois. Amazingly, the two specimens were collected some 90 years apart, the second being collected in 1985, long after the species was presumed to be extinct.
However, I think it appreciates slightly acidic wetlands (it plays with vaccinium around here, although vac. is more FACU). So it needs water and lower-than-avg pH.

Its other understory associates around here include hornbeam (iron wood?), witchhazel and even a few mapleleaf viburnums (although like blueberry the majority prefer border-edge FACU).

update: saw the first spicebush swallowtail two days ago.

Dan
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:33 PM   #16
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I missed this thread earlier but thanks to gbreadman and his info on Lindera benzoin it was bumped up. The list from Tallamy for the Mid-Atlantic woodies is especially appreciated, NEWisc. And I'm happy to say that I have 9 of those listed (10 if you count Lindera benzoin)! Now I have to work on getting to work on the others...
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:44 PM   #17
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I missed this thread earlier but thanks to gbreadman and his info on Lindera benzoin it was bumped up. The list from Tallamy for the Mid-Atlantic woodies is especially appreciated, NEWisc. And I'm happy to say that I have 9 of those listed (10 if you count Lindera benzoin)! Now I have to work on getting to work on the others...
It looks like all the butterflies have to do is show up; you've got the feast all prepared!
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Old 06-04-2009, 01:10 PM   #18
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IAnd I'm happy to say that I have 9 of those listed (10 if you count Lindera benzoin)! Now I have to work on getting to work on the others...
Wow - that's a lot of dedication and work. I'm sure the butterflies appreciate your effort!
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Old 06-04-2009, 01:22 PM   #19
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I can only take credit for about half of those that I have; the others were here when I got here (oak, pine, crabapple, willow, and maple). However, the rest were put in by me (pat myself on the back)! Hard but rewarding work.

I am looking forward to obtaining several of the others.
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:29 AM   #20
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I'm an unapologetic tree lover. Everyone needs more trees. Hedgerowe... you definitely need more trees. tee he. What other ones do you have your eye on?
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