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Old 03-13-2013, 10:35 AM   #21
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Nice additions to the thread!
What do you do with them after they're caught?

I've seen the dobsonflies and they really are a MONSTER of an insect!
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:41 AM   #22
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Caught these in West Jeff in June 2012.

One on the left is a bisected honey locust moth (Syssphinx bisecta). I did not bother to figure out its sex because I don't have the trees necessary to raise it.

One on the right is a male Io. He did not want to show off his pretty hindwings. He is the first Io I ever caught. May be the first one I've ever seen but it is tough to tell big yellow moths apart when they are flying 10' above you.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:56 AM   #23
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Nice additions to the thread!
What do you do with them after they're caught?
Unless it is a female moth whose eggs I want, they get let go just before I leave. Females tend to be less interested in lights than males so finding the females can be tough unless you're in an area inundated with the species you want.

I remember bringing home just three moths from West Jeff over the last few years, two imperials and one luna. There have been quite a few others I'd love to raise but I just don't have access to the necessary trees/plants.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:05 AM   #24
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Unless it is a female moth whose eggs I want, they get let go just before I leave.
What do you raise the moths and butterflies for? Educational purpose? Show? Personal collection of dead mounts? aid in their reproduction?
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:49 AM   #25
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What do you raise the moths and butterflies for? Educational purpose? Show? Personal collection of dead mounts? aid in their reproduction?
I do lepidoptera presentations at schools. I teach kids about moths/butterflies and how it is important that nature be preserved/respected so we can keep having moths and butterflies. August and September are my big months. I take a lot of caterpillars. Some moths if I'm lucky. (Last year, lunas decided to do a 3rd brood here. In 2011, it was polyphemus that decided to do a 3rd brood. Both firsts in my experience in central Ohio.) I'll also cut open some poly, luna, and cecropia cocoons so the kids can see the live pupae. Kids love to see a wiggling luna pupa. They cannot believe the moth won't come out until next year.

I never had a pinned collection until 2011 when I had to do one for an entomology class. Whole project took WAY more time than I expected. I still have a bunch of frozen insects in my extra fridge. I still have a bunch of pinned insects I never identified. Best thing that came out of the project was I bought a microscope. Makes insects even more amazing. Plus, it's really cool when you find a surprise teeny insect on the bigger insect you were observing.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:52 AM   #26
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Top one is a polyphemus. Bottom one is a cecropia. They are both females. I raised these and my son took the picture.
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Last edited by KC Clark; 03-13-2013 at 11:54 AM. Reason: Forgot to mention the sexes.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:17 PM   #27
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I never had a pinned collection until 2011 when I had to do one for an entomology class.
Too bad one must "still" harvest the living to create such a thing. Isn't there any other options than that? Like bringing in a vintage collection to identify them or something of the sort?
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:45 PM   #28
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Quote:
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Top one is a polyphemus. Bottom one is a cecropia. They are both females. I raised these and my son took the picture.
I raised polyphemus moths last year. Very big moths! That cecropia is gorgeous!

I have on promethea moth and lots of black swallowtails overwintering this year. I raise whatever I can find. It sounds like you get quite involved in the critter raising!

I could never been an entomologist because I could never intentionally kill the insects. Oh well...
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Old 03-13-2013, 04:47 PM   #29
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Too bad one must "still" harvest the living to create such a thing. Isn't there any other options than that? Like bringing in a vintage collection to identify them or something of the sort?
I thought you might find it useful to read The Lepidopterists' Society statement on collecting.

Statement on Collecting : The Lepidopterist Society

The class I took was a required course for entomology majors. We spent two days a week closely examining insects that had been previously caught and mounted. But that does not give you experience with collecting, spreading, and mounting. These are skills learned by practice and using the tools of the trade. They are skills that graduating entomology majors should have.

Most people don't know that when it comes to identifying microlepidoptera (micro moths - wingspan under 20 mm), you cannot tell which species you are looking at under a microscope. The moths are identified by their genitalia. So, you have to dissect the teeny moths, get their reproductive tract out, put it on a slide, and stain it. Point being, you cannot even ID these moths without killing them. If you have $, you can run DNA these days but the moths are still dead.

If you want to look at a lot of microlep genitalia, I recommend Olethreutine Moths of the Midwestern United States. An Identification Guide by Gilligan, Wright, and Gibson. "More than 650 genitalia photographs"

Tortricid.net - Olethreutine Moths of the Midwestern United States

Definitely not a coffee table book. I don't own it. I read OSU's copy.

Micro insects are the big thing these days if you want to discover some new species.
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:01 PM   #30
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I hadn't seen this thread before. I have some non-current moth photos to add.

Imperial moth caterpillar and chrysalis (they bury themselves in the ground, and it isn't woven, so it is a chrysalis, even if it is from a moth)

Let's Showcase Moths!-imperial-moth-caterpillar-1.jpg Let's Showcase Moths!-imperial-moth-chrysalis-1.jpg

soybean looper moth
Let's Showcase Moths!-soybean-looper-moth-zinnia.jpg

Polyphemus moth
Let's Showcase Moths!-polyphemus-moth-screen-2.jpg

Pandora sphinx moth
Let's Showcase Moths!-pandora-sphinx-moth-uses-virginia-creeper-grape-web.jpg
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bear mountain catskills, caterpillar, cecropia, chrysalis, gravid, isabella moth, moth, moths, pandora sphinx, polyphemus, regal, showcase, soybean looper

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