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Old 03-07-2013, 11:09 AM   #21
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Default Butterflies of Indiana

Found a new book for you folks in Indiana, Butterflies of Indiana. Book came out in December. The author is Jeffrey Belth. It is not the guy who did the Ohio and Michigan books. In fact, I don't even recognize the name. But, if I lived in Indiana, I'd grab a copy because the reviews look good.

Amazon.com: Butterflies of Indiana: A Field Guide (Indiana Natural Science) (9780253009555): Jeffrey E. Belth: Books


And just to prove that I'm not an Ohio snob, I own Butterflies of Alabama: Glimpses into Their Lives and I highly recommend it. This is not a field guide. There are 500+ pages to cover 84 butterflies. LOTs of pictures but I don't remember there being a lot of egg pics. Good info about each butterfly, including factoids about the caterpillars, but some butterflies get more coverage than others (I thought my favorite juniper hairstreak deserved more coverage). At the back of the book is an Alabama county map for each butterfly, showing the counties where the butterfly has been recorded.

Amazon.com: Butterflies of Alabama: Glimpses into Their Lives (Gosse Nature Guides) (9780817355951): Paulette Haywood Ogard, Sara Cunningham Bright: Books
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:07 PM   #22
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I posted this elsewhere deep in another thread, but this seems a good place for people to find it.

This is my favorite butterfly website, Butterflies of the Carolinas and Virginia, done by Randy Emmitt, the rle in the URL. It is easily searchable, and most of the butterflies are found throughout the east coast.

Butterflies of the Carolinas & Virginias
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:43 PM   #23
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OK. Dueling state butterfly websites at ten paces, eh??

The Ohio Division of Natural Resources put out a load of free ID guides. I don't how many but I have a stack. Some of them are available online. They are NOT small downloads. The butterflies one is 83 meg pdf. It is 80 pages and covers 59 of Ohio's butterflies (there are roughly 140).

Identification Guides


THE field guide for Ohio butterflies is Butterflies of Ohio by Jaret Daniels. It covers every butterfly you might see here. Jaret is an entomologist at the University of Florida. I had the pleasure of going butterfly hunting with him plus taking a couple classes from him. He will be one of the head guys at Mothapalooza this year.

Butterflies of Ohio Field Guide: Jaret C. Daniels: 9781591930563: Amazon.com: Books

Mothapalooza!
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:03 PM   #24
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Ohio is far enough from NC that our butterflies only partially overlap, so consider them complementary websites, not competing!

Mothapalooza looks like a lot of fun. If I wasn't already commited that weekend (it is our annual family beach trip, the first week after school ends), I would go. Maybe when my schedule stops revolving around school schedules in a few years, I'll give it a try. We often drive through Ohio on our way to see family in Michigan.

I have Butterflies of the Carolinas by Jaret Daniels, and it is well-thumbed. It was my favorite resource until I found the website, and it is still what I carry with me in the field. Some of the photos in this guide turn out to be by the guy who does the website, and they are friends. I would love to go butterfly-ing with either of them!
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:38 AM   #25
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Default Butterflies of America

This website has more butterfly information than most people are going to want but if you have a butterfly that you cannot figure out, this is the place to go.

Introduction to the Interactive List of American Butterfly Names

The catalogue is a wealth of information. Pick a species you think you know and you'll find out about variants and subspecies you've never heard about.

Danaus plexippus thumbnails
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Old 03-20-2013, 02:03 PM   #26
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Default Butterflies of Wisconsin

I have to get in on this dueling state butterfly website contest.

This is one that I use a lot:
Butterflies — wisconsinbutterflies.org

I haven't met the owner (Mike Reese) but I have corresponded with him on several ID's and butterfly viewing opportunities. He's is quite active in the North American Butterfly Association.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:56 PM   #27
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Default The Butterflies of West Virginia and Their Caterpillars

The Butterflies Of West Virginia and their Caterpillars (Pitt Series in Nature and Natural History): Thomas Allen: 9780822956570: Amazon.com: Books

I’ve known this book existed for some time but never bought a copy. Well, that changed when I recently found an author signed copy. So, now it is in my Lepidoptera library.

Book is old by current state Lep book standards, having come out in 1997. Probably the only changes would be someone figured out some more butterflies exist in WV (an Ohio book I got from the ‘80s was missing a couple butterflies – amazed me no one had documented them by then).

Something that I like that you don’t see too often; Book explains the characteristics of the different families and subfamilies. That helps you understand why butterflies end up in the groupings they are in.

Book covers 128 different species. Each species gets 1 to 1.5 pages, including a WV map showing you which counties the butterfly has been documented in. Sub-headings are: Description, Distribution, Habitat, Life History and Habits, Nectar Sources, and Larval Host Plant. I liked the extra info that was often found in the Larval Host Plant section: “In captivity the Early Hairstreak can be easily reared on willows.” “The Great Purple Hairstreak uses mistletoe as its host, feeding on male flowers and leaves.” Info like that helps you find and raise caterpillars.

All pictures are on picture plates at the back of the book. This is not everyone’s favorite way of arranging a book but I find it very useful when you are trying to identify something (you don’t have to go through every page in a book). You get ventral and dorsal views of every butterfly, something else which can be useful for IDing a butterfly.

I did not count but I think there is a caterpillar pic for every species.

Next comes my favorite part of the book, Butterfly Pupae. Very few books have these pics so including these makes me really like this book, especially since almost all these butterflies are in my state. On the downside, there are only pics for half of the species in the book.

The back of the book includes a glossary, something useful that you don’t normally see in this type of book.

On the back cover of the version I have, there is a picture of a bilateral gynandromorph Diana that was collected in WV. I’d go nuts if I saw one of those flying around. Sad that it ended up in someone’s collection.

If you could not tell, I’m pleased with my purchase since the chrysalis pics makes it a keeper.




The chrysalis that really caught my eye in the book is the falcate orangetip. Cool how pointy it is. I'd like to see the butterfly emerging from that. None on YouTube.

Anthocharis midea annickae (immatures)


Pic of a bilateral gynandromorph Diana

a perfect bilateral gynandromorph specimen in my dad?s collection (a Speyeria diana)?the Holy Grail of butterflies. Photos from Kathy (Kathy) on Myspace


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