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Old 09-26-2010, 08:52 AM   #81
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Nice shots, amelanchier!
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Old 09-26-2010, 08:54 AM   #82
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Many monarch caterpillars are eaten. A female lays up to 400 eggs and maybe 1% make it to adulthood.

...I miss this place. School has been tough this year. I am too tired most nights. Hope everyone is well...
I didn't realize that. I'm glad I got the two that I had. There were only three A. tuberosa on the property at that time. I've added a few more already and some common milkweed. I'll continue to add more and create a monarch haven here.

I know school has been tough for you this year. I really feel for you. I hope things get better...and soon. Good to see you posting again when you have a chance.

I've not been posting as much either.


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I don't know how to embed video here, so I am attaching the link to one of the videos I uploaded to You Tube. I am not a videographer, but I wanted you guys to see the river of monarchs we got to see on Saturday morning! There were THOUSANDS flying out of the dunes! Such a beautiful site!


As far as I know, that is the only way to upload a video here...at least that was how I had to do it.

Thanks for filming it and sharing it here. That would be so cool to see.

What chance do I have of witnessing something similar going through my yard (NE PA) if I get more nectar and host plants on our two acres?
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:26 PM   #83
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This morning I noticed lots of butterflies in the woods in the backyard. There were many Question Marks, Red Spotted Purples and Red Admirals all around the rotting persimmons on the ground. This is the first time I've seen a Question Mark, mostly because this is the first year I've been actively scouting and photographing butterflies. They were very attracted to my light colored jumper and several Question Marks and a Hackberry Emperor kept landing on me. The Red Admirals preferred the light colored bark of the Tulip Poplar nearby.

First is a beautiful Question Mark feasting on a persimmon. Next is a Red Admiral also enjoying the fruit and two others sunbathing on the Tulip Poplar. A Red Spotted Purple enjoys the fall harvest. And my very old, very tattered and faded friend the Hackberry Emperor visiting my arm.
Attached Thumbnails
~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-question-mark-2.jpg   ~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-red-admiral.jpg   ~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-sunbathing.jpg   ~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-red-spotted-purple-2.jpg   ~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-hackberry-emperor-top-2.jpg  

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Old 09-29-2010, 12:31 PM   #84
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The Hackberry Emperor on a tuliptree leaf.
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~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-hackberry-emperor-2.jpg  
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Old 09-29-2010, 04:21 PM   #85
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linrose,

Great variety. Thanks for posting them. It is inspiring.

I've seen a few Question Marks over the summer, but no Red Admirals yet.

Growing up, I guess I only knew the more common trees, because persimmon and hackberry are fairly new to me. They were suggested to me last year or so and I plan to add some hackberry to the yard. Maybe some of your friend's kin will come to the yard once I have some hackberry established.

The hardest thing for me is figuring out companion plants for trees that I've never seen in nature--or never recognized if I did.
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Old 09-29-2010, 06:35 PM   #86
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The Hackberry Emperor on a tuliptree leaf.
He is much more attractive than I realized.

I have a tulip tree seedling, and the neighbor has at least one or two full grown ones. Is that another host plant for the hackberry by any chance. <grin>
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Old 09-29-2010, 06:50 PM   #87
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This morning I noticed lots of butterflies in the woods in the backyard. There were many Question Marks, Red Spotted Purples and Red Admirals all around the rotting persimmons on the ground. This is the first time I've seen a Question Mark, mostly because this is the first year I've been actively scouting and photographing butterflies. They were very attracted to my light colored jumper and several Question Marks and a Hackberry Emperor kept landing on me. The Red Admirals preferred the light colored bark of the Tulip Poplar nearby.

First is a beautiful Question Mark feasting on a persimmon. Next is a Red Admiral also enjoying the fruit and two others sunbathing on the Tulip Poplar. A Red Spotted Purple enjoys the fall harvest. And my very old, very tattered and faded friend the Hackberry Emperor visiting my arm.
Very beautiful photos, Linrose! You are so lucky to see so many different species of butterflies. I've never seen a Question Mark nor the Hackberry Emperor. Beautiful!!
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Old 09-29-2010, 07:25 PM   #88
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I didn't realize that. I'm glad I got the two that I had. There were only three A. tuberosa on the property at that time. I've added a few more already and some common milkweed. I'll continue to add more and create a monarch haven here.

I love tuberosa, but they prefer incarnata, syriaca and exaltata more. I don't often find caterpillars on the tuberosa until the other milkweeds are gone. I found a bunch of incarnata seeds this past weekend and would be glad to share some with you! I also plan on growing a whole bunch of milkweed again next spring and will get some to you.

I know school has been tough for you this year. I really feel for you. I hope things get better...and soon. Good to see you posting again when you have a chance.
School has been rough. We are back in our building after the mold remediation and I am now back in my classroom. Starting the year like that has not been good for an academically challenged group of kids...

What chance do I have of witnessing something similar going through my yard (NE PA) if I get more nectar and host plants on our two acres?
I'm not sure if you'd see a migration of that magnitude unless you lived in the migratory path, the Atlantic Flyway. I live three blocks from the ocean and in the direct path of migration, so I see the monarchs as well as the birds migrate overhead. John lives inland and he does not see the migration. By planting more host plants, you are guaranteed to see monarchs and other butterflies all summer long! If you want to see the migration, come down to south Jersey next Fall! You can sleep on my sofa bed.
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Old 09-29-2010, 07:26 PM   #89
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A Sulphur of some sort, Orange Sulphur?
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~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-coliaseurythemeorangesulphur2.jpg   ~Photos! Butterflies, Moths & Caterpillars 2010~-coliaseurythemeorangesulphur.jpg  
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Old 09-29-2010, 07:54 PM   #90
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bridget - I was very happily surprised to see so many different species all in the same area around the persimmon, and so many of each. I've been so used to looking for butterflies nectaring on flowers I'd forgotten to look elsewhere. They were landing on me everywhere, even on top of my head which was a bit unnerving but pretty cool too! Jason has now taken to calling me "Nature Girl" LOL!!!!!

Anyone seen Jim Carrey in "Ace Ventura : When Nature Calls"? Come to me my jungle friends!
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