Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Butterflies & Moths

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-18-2010, 01:37 PM   #21
Salamander
 
ButterflyLinda's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Default

I raise caterpillars because I like doing it and I get awfully tired of seeing them die because of their many enemies. Although even bringing them in as eggs doesn't guarantee survival. I DO have to limit myself, however! I don't want to spend a lot of time on that. Right now, I'm not raising any, just watching for emergence of some that pupated...those that don't emerge for quite a while. Of course, you COULD document the raising of the cat! If that would help. People need to learn more about the life cycle!
ButterflyLinda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 03:55 PM   #22
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bridget1964 View Post
Beautiful photos and great close ups, too! I am not very good at macro photography, but you obviously are!
Thank you, Mary (bridget). I probably should set up a tripod--Preview http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...cons/icon1.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by tineckbone http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...s/viewpost.gif
Not at all and thank you for the compliment.

I am still wrestling with it in my mind. The little critter is doing well, there was quite a bit of frass in the container this morning and he is visibly larger.


Good, I didn't think you'd take it the wrong way, just making sure. You are welcome--it is true.

I know it has to weigh on your mind...I'm glad you are enjoying the experience. I've never been able to observe caterpillar larvae until this year with the Monarch "cats"; it is remarkable how fast they double in size.

The other day I spotted another butterfly larva--looks a lot like the spicebush caterpillar's early instar stage--but with antenae like things. I went back today and he is twice the size...and I spotted a second one too! (The first pic is the second, smaller instar.) It is on my quaking aspen--here are some pics. An ID would be appreciated. between my shaking, a breeze (think quaking aspen in the slightest breeze), and a camera that decides what I'm trying to focus on (and is often wrong), I'm lucky I get anything good. It takes patience and luck...and a LOT of messed up photos that get deleted.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 04:15 PM   #23
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bridget1964 View Post
EUREKA! Man, I almost broke out in a sweat trying to ID your critter. I am quite proud of myself, sifting through the 65 lepidoptera that use the quaking aspen as a host plant, but I finally found it! Scroll down to see a photo of the larva.

Red spotted purple
Thank you so much for all of your time and effort. While I was running errands you were running around the internet doing all the legwork. When I asked I just assumed someone would recognize it--like you are all walking encyclopedias or something.

I know I've heard about red spotted purples on WG before and thinking it was something I'd love to attract. After a search I see that MrILoveTheAnts and ButterflyLinda posted a picture which introduced this species to me. Very attractive and I'm happy to know that I'll likely be seeing some in the near future.

Thanks again for the ID--I'm adding it to my list of visitors...that makes two so far--is two a list or do I need three or more?
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 05:10 PM   #24
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

Just as an aside, I recently learned that Black Swallowtails, and any others that use parsley/dill/queen anne's lace as larval plants are not native to North America. They are believed to have been introduced, along with their host plants, when the first humans crossed the land bridge from Asia.

So they have been here a long, long time, but are not officially native. Should we plant larval plants for them?

And while I agree in principle with the playing no favorites in the food chains in my garden, removing a single caterpillar for the pleasure of raising it is unlikely to make a significant impact on the predators and will give a great deal of pleasure, so I say "go for it!"
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 05:41 PM   #25
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
Just as an aside, I recently learned that Black Swallowtails, and any others that use parsley/dill/queen anne's lace as larval plants are not native to North America. They are believed to have been introduced, along with their host plants, when the first humans crossed the land bridge from Asia.

So they have been here a long, long time, but are not officially native. Should we plant larval plants for them?
Hm... What I don't get about that is that parsley, dill, and QAL weren't here before Europeans, and black swallowtails are not found in Asia. If they've been here 12,000 years or more, I would say they can count as native, though, in the sense that they have co-evolved long enough with native ecological communities. I still question that theory that they came over the Bering land bridge, though...
__________________
"I take the part of the trees as against all their enemies." -J.R.R. Tolkien
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 09:44 PM   #26
Salamander
 
ButterflyLinda's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Default

The Eastern Black Swallowtail is a new-world species. Douglas Tallamy explains their adaptation to use those nonnative plants in his book, Bringing Nature Home. BTW, I have two native species of parsley...and they did extremely well this year. Almost all of the Black Swallowtail caterpillars were on the native species this year, even though I also grow Italian Parsley, Rue, Bronze Fennel and Green Fennel.
ButterflyLinda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 01:39 AM   #27
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

ButterflyLinda, what do you grow for native parsley? When I look them up, there are so many plants called parsley in lots of different genuses that I have no idea what it might be.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 01:46 AM   #28
Fox
 
benj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Chesterfield, Virginia
Default Broken Contract

Quote:
Originally Posted by tineckbone View Post
As most of you know I have a strict non-interference stance when it comes to the insects in my yarden.
Mr. Non-Interference, you have broken your contract with Nature. You should repent and resolve to uphold your own standards, lest you fall to corruption and shame.
benj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 10:41 AM   #29
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by benj1 View Post
Mr. Non-Interference, you have broken your contract with Nature. You should repent and resolve to uphold your own standards, lest you fall to corruption and shame.
I had to re-read this because for a second I thought you were saying something else, which sparks this alternate view:

Mr. Non-Interference, you have broken your connection with Nature--you are part of nature yourself, so your curiosity and interest in this creature is part of that connection.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 10:57 AM   #30
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ButterflyLinda View Post
The Eastern Black Swallowtail is a new-world species. Douglas Tallamy explains their adaptation to use those nonnative plants in his book, Bringing Nature Home. BTW, I have two native species of parsley...and they did extremely well this year. Almost all of the Black Swallowtail caterpillars were on the native species this year, even though I also grow Italian Parsley, Rue, Bronze Fennel and Green Fennel.
My source that they are an old world species that have been here for thousands of years and arrived with their larval species is a friend of mine who is a UNC PhD student doing her PhD thesis on swallowtail butterflies. I assume(d) she is an accurate source, but will ask her for references on it and post them.
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
aspen, butterflies, butterfly, caterpillar, caterpillar id, caterpillar photos, caterpillars, cats, daucosma laciniatum, dilemma, dill, host, host plants, larva, leaf, monarch, native dill, native insects, native plants, parsely, polytaenia nuttallii, prairie parsley, pupate, tree, trees

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2