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MrILoveTheAnts 06-15-2010 07:27 PM

What's Flying Around
 
5 Attachment(s)
Red-Spotted Purple, Question Mark (I think), and two of those small blues you see now and then.

The Red-Spotted Purple and Question Mark I saw at a friend's house down in the far south of New Jersey (off exit 7 of 1-295). It was a small class on macro photography and I impressed everyone by finding some pretty butterflies the instructor didn't know she had in her yard. The Red-Spotted Purple was particularly cooperative and I suspect was freshly hatched.

The two small blues, elfins, or whatever they are, were taken in my yard maybe a few weeks ago. They're amazingly tiny.

bridget1964 06-15-2010 08:12 PM

Very nice photos of some very pretty flutterbies! What kinds of fruits are in that feeder other than bananas?

I saw a gray hairstreak, a bunch of cabbage whites and a few painted ladies today at school. We have six monarch caterpillars, all first instar and a spicebush swallowtail caterpillar, also first or second instar.

dapjwy 06-15-2010 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MrILoveTheAnts (Post 69361)
Red-Spotted Purple, Question Mark (I think), and two of those small blues you see now and then.

The Red-Spotted Purple and Question Mark I saw at a friend's house down in the far south of New Jersey (off exit 7 of 1-295). It was a small class on macro photography and I impressed everyone by finding some pretty butterflies the instructor didn't know she had in her yard. The Red-Spotted Purple was particularly cooperative and I suspect was freshly hatched.

The two small blues, elfins, or whatever they are, were taken in my yard maybe a few weeks ago. They're amazingly tiny.

Great shots! The question mark is more beautiful than I realized.

MrILoveTheAnts 06-15-2010 08:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by dapjwy (Post 69380)
Great shots! The question mark is more beautiful than I realized.

When it comes to Question Marks, Eastern Commas and that sort of butterfly it really depends if the wings are open or not. They go from jewel of the sky to a ratty looking leaf in an instant.

MrILoveTheAnts 06-15-2010 08:43 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by bridget1964 (Post 69370)
Very nice photos of some very pretty flutterbies! What kinds of fruits are in that feeder other than bananas?

I saw a gray hairstreak, a bunch of cabbage whites and a few painted ladies today at school. We have six monarch caterpillars, all first instar and a spicebush swallowtail caterpillar, also first or second instar.

That is a great assortment of butterflies to have. I actually don't know what fruit was in the feeder. It all looked a little to dry for me. I want to guess Musk Mellon (Cantaloupe). They may as well be mushroom heads though, I really don't know. I intended to ask but got caught up with the beekeepers meeting that fallowed the photo class.

Here's another angle but I don't think it helps much.

dapjwy 06-15-2010 08:47 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Yesterday I went for a walk and saw all sorts of things--I planned to post here and on my blog, but I've been too lazy.

After spotting several birds, two mammals, and a LOT of baby amphibians, I returned home to spot several different butterflies--cabbage whites, two very small butterflies I can't ID, and then this (pictured below), which I *think* is a viceroy and not a monarch--Bridget (Mary), could you help me out here? (or anyone else).

I'm just happy to see the few butterflies I have--I hope to see a lot more...and several of each species instead of just the one.

Oh yeah, today I saw one wing of the Luna moth on the shoulder of the road. I was going to reply to the luna moth thread too, but never did....at least I know they are in the area. And to end on a happier note (a live butterfly), I saw what I took to be a tiger swallowtail flying through my yard today.

bridget1964 06-15-2010 09:23 PM

Yes, your photos are definitely of a viceroy. Sounds like you had a nice walk!

Cirsium 06-15-2010 10:45 PM

Quote:

The two small blues, elfins, or whatever they are, were taken in my yard maybe a few weeks ago. They're amazingly tiny.
I think this is the Spring Azure butterfly. Interestingly the caterpillars are tended by ants.
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/s...4*New%20Jersey

MrILoveTheAnts 06-15-2010 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cirsium (Post 69401)
I think this is the Spring Azure butterfly. Interestingly the caterpillars are tended by ants.
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species?l=1591&chosen_state=34*New%20Jersey

I was hoping to attract this sort of butterfly to my yard. I actually attempted to plant $35 worth of Lupinus perennis seeds for the endangered one of those. My rough clay soil was to much for it though, none of the plants survived. Toying with the idea of mixing in a patch of sand somewhere and trying again.

I do have a New Jersey tea growing though, that's at least a host for one of those butterflies that does the ant thing. Thanks for pointing that out to me.

Cirsium 06-16-2010 12:20 AM

Quote:

I actually attempted to plant $35 worth of Lupinus perennis seeds for the endangered one of those. My rough clay soil was to much for it though, none of the plants survived. Toying with the idea of mixing in a patch of sand somewhere and trying again.
Yes, the Lupinus perennis really needs good drainage. I only see it growing in sandy soils. If you are just trying a small area, a raised bed (placed on top of the clay) might work.


One other butterfly that might be a possibility is the Edward's Hairstreak.
Quote:

Males perch on trees to watch for females. Eggs are laid in bark crevices of young hosts. Young caterpillars eat buds during the day. Older caterpillars eat leaves at night and hide during the day in ant nests at the base of the host tree. In return for protection, the ants feed on honeydew produced by the caterpillars.
Species Detail | Butterflies and Moths of North America


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