Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Butterflies & Moths

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-15-2010, 02:04 PM   #1
Salamander
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Annapolis, MD
Default Native Aristolochia for pipevine swallowtail?

Well, I've read several conflicting things while trying to research this, so I thought I'd ask the experts. . .

What's the consensus on the native Aristolochia that is the best host plant for pipevine swallowtail?

Pipevine Aristolochia

NABA only refers to macrophylla, so I'm inclined to think that's the best option, but other places refer to tomentosa, too.

(and there's lots of folks planting what are clearly non-native forms, but I'm only interested in native Aristolochia that will be good host plants)
Teresa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 02:34 PM   #2
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

Aristolochia serpentaria is native to Maryland, and is supposed to a host plant for pipevine swallotails too. It's a much smaller plant, so you might need more of them.

PLANTS Profile for Aristolochia serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot) | USDA PLANTS

I'm not an expert and I haven't seen any pipevine swallowtails here, but something eats it here in my yard.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 03:00 PM   #3
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

I think one of the pipevine species had it's name changed. I'll post more when I get home.
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 03:10 PM   #4
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

Nice link to the NABA site, lots of good information there!

Just from looking at the native distribution of the 3 pipevines in your area, it looks like A. serpentaria is what the butterflies in your area are probably using. I mention this because some butterflies get 'in the habit' of using certain host plants, even when there are other suitable host plants available. It can sometimes increase the odds to use the same plant that the butterflies are using in your local area.

Having said that, A. serpentaria is a small plant and you have to supply lots of them. If you get a lot of butterflies they will eat these plants down to nubs in no time. If that's not workable for your situation, my recommendation would be A. macrophylla (note that many places still list this plant as A. durior).

(Oh - I'm not an expert either, but I try my best ).
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 04:02 PM   #5
Salamander
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Racine, Ohio along the Ohio River
Default

Neither A. macrophylla nor A. tomentosa are native to tidewater Maryland. Given the choice between the two for your area, I would recommend A. tomentosa. It grows faster and is more adaptable to lower elevations. A. macrophylla usually is found in the mountains.
__________________
Porterbrook Native Plants
Porterbrook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 01:42 PM   #6
Heron
 
jpdenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Tinley Park, Illinois, USA
Default

Anyone know of a good source for Aristolochia serpentaria plants or seeds? I'd like to try growing it. I think that's the only species native near here.

John
__________________
Click here for an album of some of my nature photos.
jpdenk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 02:38 PM   #7
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

Quote:
Anyone know of a good source for Aristolochia serpentaria plants or seeds? I'd like to try growing it. I think that's the only species native near here.

I don't have any personal experience with this source, but I have seen good reviews of his plants on some butterfly forums He also sells seeds.

Owner: Rod Angeroth
PO Box 877, Stanton, NE 68779-0877
402-439-5256;
Location: 715 11th St.

email: rodangeroth at yahoo.com
Specializing in woodsgrown botanicals, jumbo-size ginseng roots (12 years +), large-size goldenseal roots & black cohosh, jack-in-the-pulpit, bloodroot and Virginia snakeroot. Fresh roots available for tinctures or planting stock.

A. tomentosa is native in the southern part of IL. The pipevine swallowtail gets reported well north of it's host plants range almost every year. I know it gets into southern Wisconsin. It seems that botanical gardens, homeowners, etc., growing the pipevine plants as ornamentals have allowed this butterfly to produce broods north of its traditional range.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 03:00 PM   #8
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

If anyone on the east coast is interested I had a hard time finding a source for this plant. I don't know if this is a "good" source yet but I ordered Aristolochia macrophylla (USDA) from Brushwood Nursery. That's the only Pipevine they sell though.

It's odd the Pipevine Swallowtail doesn't have a wider range. The caterpillars over winter in they crystals stage after all. Maybe they aren't as cold hardy?
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 03:40 PM   #9
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

According to Carolyn Harstad Go Native!,Gardening with Natives Plants and Wildflowers in the Lower Midwest, Woolly Dutchman's Pipe Aristolochia tomentosa is "our native pipevine".
Charles Deam in Flora of Indiana reported it here and grow it at his home in NE Indiana.
I think it use to occur farther north than it does now but its habituate has be restricted by agriculture.
__________________
We do not inherit the land from our fathers, we borrow it from our children.
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 12:16 AM   #10
Heron
 
jpdenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Tinley Park, Illinois, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by milkweed View Post
According to Carolyn Harstad Go Native!,Gardening with Natives Plants and Wildflowers in the Lower Midwest, Woolly Dutchman's Pipe Aristolochia tomentosa is "our native pipevine".
Charles Deam in Flora of Indiana reported it here and grow it at his home in NE Indiana.
I think it use to occur farther north than it does now but its habituate has be restricted by agriculture.
I took a look at the USDA page for that species (click here) and it shows Aristolochia tomentosa as being documented mainly in very far southern Indiana and Illinois. Aristolochia serpentaria, on the other hand, occurs over much of the two states (click here), so that's the one I plan on planting.

If you click on Indiana or Illinois on the map on the above pages, it will show the counties where the plants have been documented from.

John
__________________
Click here for an album of some of my nature photos.
jpdenk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
aristolochia, aristolochia macrophylla, aristolochia serpentaria, butterfly, butterfly habitat, caterpillars, dutchman's pipe, host plant, macrophylla, native, pipevine, pipevine swallowtail, serpentaria, swallowtail, tomentosa, woolly dutchman's pipe

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2