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Old 09-16-2010, 07:12 PM   #21
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Hi Everyone -

Sorry to have been away for so long - some health problems, and then, once better, how to keep up with gardening AND this wonderful forum? Glad you are still here.

I cold moist stratified (moist paper towels inside plastic bag in the fridge) for 8 weeks as Equil suggested. Then, second week in July, if memory serves, planted half my seeds in pots indoors and the other half in several (well marked) location in the garden. Did my best to keep them moist for a long time (six weeks, I think, I was pretty diligent.)

Unfortunately, nary a sprout. I may not have stratified correctly, or perhaps gave up too soon on watering. In any case, a few weeks ago I dug up one of the pots and found a perfect looking seed which appeared to not have even attempted sprouting (seed hull intact.)

So that set me to wondering - should I just treat these pots as winter sowing candidates - that is, water them, and give them a taste of real winter, hoping they'll reconsider next spring? Maybe those in the ground have a chance of coming up next spring as well?

I consider the seeds to be precious and am not giving up easily. I'm hoping that what I may have botched, Nature can correct.
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Old 09-16-2010, 08:19 PM   #22
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The seed I was sent did germinate however the germination rate was low. My seed was cold stratified for ten weeks. Not because it was my intent to stratify it beyond eight weeks. The seed was forgotten. Of interest would be that my seed took quite a long time to germinate once placed in a tray.

Lib, Is it possible her seed dried from the time you first mailed it to me and when you mailed it to Wild Joy?

Wild Joy, I would suggest wintersowing the seed or accepting the offer of a plant from member bogger.
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Old 09-17-2010, 11:57 AM   #23
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If the seed is sensitive to drying out it may just be that I gave up on it too soon. We've had a wet early summer, but very dry late summer, so I know that the seeds in the garden are parched by now. I'm just curious to see if the seeds could stand that kind of drying out and still sprout next year. I guess time will tell!

I might have better luck with the plants - I'll look into that after I get back from vacation if they're still available.
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Old 09-17-2010, 10:38 PM   #24
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Or.... it could be I stored it wrong. Lemme do some checking on this!!! Maybe I screwed you up.
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Old 09-17-2010, 11:28 PM   #25
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This is the best info I could find on Aristolochia serpentaria:
Quote:
Seed - best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Pre-soak stored seed for 48 hours in hand-hot water and surface sow in a greenhouse[134]. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 3 months at 20c[134]. Stored seed germinates better if it is given 3 months cold stratification at 5c[200]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer after the last expected frosts. Division in autumn[200]. Root cuttings in winter[200].
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I don't have any personal experience with germinating Aristolochia serpentaria, but I did germinate some A. tomentosa this way and it worked very well. The surface sowing is due to a requirement for light in order to get good germination. The alternate long stratification method (3+ months) eliminates the need for light.

If planting seed directly outside, early fall would be a good time to plant. The natural stratification would take place during the fall and early spring. A light covering of leaves would help keep the soil/seeds moist.

Winter sowing could be a bit iffy for this species. It may not have a long enough period of cold moist stratification.
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Old 09-20-2010, 05:20 AM   #26
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I have to agree with NEWisc.

I've had the best luck with germination by planting the seed outside in the fall. Cover the seeds with about 1/2" of soil, mulch well, and wait for spring. You may need to thin the mulch in the spring to prevent smothering the young seedlings.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:18 AM   #27
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They say the seeds shouldn't be dried:
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Old 09-23-2010, 02:44 AM   #28
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Oopsie, "We do not allow the seed to dry out--it is picked, cold stored in moist medium, and should be planted immediately upon receipt. Seed sown in the fall will germinate in the late spring--it is a surprisingly late germinator so do not prematurely discard flats. Keep the flats shaded and moist. See the virginia snakeroot chapter in my book "Growing at-risk" for much more information on this." I see what you're saying. I planted mine out right away and the rest I stuck in a paper envelope. The folk I sent the seed to didn't get it shipped to them in damp sphagnum. Sorry about that. I screwed you guys up.
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aristolochia, aristolochia macrophylla, aristolochia serpentaria, butterfly, butterfly habitat, caterpillars, dutchman's pipe, host plant, macrophylla, native, pipevine, pipevine swallowtail, serpentaria, swallowtail, tomentosa, woolly dutchman's pipe

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