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Old 12-17-2008, 09:15 PM   #11
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Thanks! In which case I also have

Solidago spp. - Goldenrods
Allium cernuum and A. tricoccum - Nodding Wild Onion and Ramps (unless mine's a wild garlic?)

Also through no fault of my own. I love the Allium, because I can rub one of its bulblets on my neck and hands and have half an hour mosquito free. I tolerate the Solidago; I'm allergic to 'em, but they were here first. And I'm getting less allergic with more exposure.
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Old 12-17-2008, 11:09 PM   #12
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May I ask which Solidago you have-
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SOLID
(giggle) You have my permission to cyber slap me if you would like since there are 75.

Another common name for ramps is wild leek. We call it wild leek. I have pictures of my plants somewhere if you want a peek. They have a distinctive look to them. Actually so do the nodding wild onions. Those two plants are particularly attractive when in bloom.

You would not want European wild garlic (sigh, that is most likely what you have) however, there is an easy way to tell the difference between Allium vineale (European Wild Garlic) and A. canadense (Wild onion) which is native to the United States. The leaves of Wild Garlic are hollow. There are other differences. The Wild Garlic smells distinctly garlicy. When you dig them up they will have a papery covering over the bulbs like tulip bulbs.

It took me three or four years to rid myself of wild garlic. Those bulblets are challenging. Ultimately, I resorted to the glove of death.
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Old 12-18-2008, 05:15 AM   #13
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The clear winners in my yard are asters and swamp milkweed.
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:55 AM   #14
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Ive always thought it would be cool to have a butterfly garden, but she who must be obeyed doesn't think so ???????
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Old 12-18-2008, 12:18 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
May I ask which Solidago you have-
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SOLID
(giggle) You have my permission to cyber slap me if you would like since there are 75.
Grr. I have the yellow one that makes me sneeze.

Actually, I think I have more than one; I remember some nodding flower heads and some that stuck straight up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
Another common name for ramps is wild leek. We call it wild leek. I have pictures of my plants somewhere if you want a peek. They have a distinctive look to them. Actually so do the nodding wild onions. Those two plants are particularly attractive when in bloom.

You would not want European wild garlic (sigh, that is most likely what you have) however, there is an easy way to tell the difference between Allium vineale (European Wild Garlic) and A. canadense (Wild onion) which is native to the United States. The leaves of Wild Garlic are hollow. There are other differences. The Wild Garlic smells distinctly garlicy. When you dig them up they will have a papery covering over the bulbs like tulip bulbs.

It took me three or four years to rid myself of wild garlic. Those bulblets are challenging. Ultimately, I resorted to the glove of death.
What I remember actually looked most like Allium schoenoprasum, which I shouldn't have this far south. But the flowerhead was a full sphere. It's probably A. vineale, but I don't remember the leaves being hollow. I'll have to check next summer.
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Old 12-18-2008, 12:54 PM   #16
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Please do post some pictures next spring.

You could very well have one of the A. schoenoprasum variations. Both are escapees. Neither of which you would want.
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Old 12-18-2008, 01:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
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You could very well have one of the A. schoenoprasum variations. Both are escapees. Neither of which you would want.
Well, poop.
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:35 PM   #18
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I've got a small 8 x 8 foot nectar butterfly garden and then some parsley for the Black Swallowtails and milkweed for the Monarchs. The plants that I have that seem to be the most popular would be buddleia and lantana.
For the hummers it's Salvia greggii "Black and Blue," Salvia elegans, Russian sage, and the buddleia. Hopefully, I can expand some next year, especially host plants.
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:59 PM   #19
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I will try my best to see if I can get you to want to part with your butterfly bush.

I finally destroyed mine after I was gently nudged to part with it. I had difficulty thinking of my butterfly bush as empty calories. We would not want to give a baby a bottle of formula with only a half of a scoop of powder instead of a full scoop. It was hard letting it go because it was particularly easy on the eyes. It is invasive in addition to being of no value to caterpillars although I know the butterflies really flock to it. Have you ever tried Summersweet or Spicebush? If you think the butterfly bushes are butterfly magnets perhaps you might fall in love with a few of those as well as purple prairie clover. Others you might really like to try would be almost any of the echinaceas or trefoils.

I have heard of people who grow parsley just for black swallowtails. I think will try that. I see a few flitting around here and would like to see more.
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Old 12-19-2008, 04:25 PM   #20
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In 2007 we actually raised 13 cats and released 11 black swallowtails. That was a lot of fun. You really should try it. We didn't bring the cats in this year though (the success rate was much lower), because there was just too much going on with the new puppies. Maybe next year.

Aw, I wasn't aware how "bad" buddelias are for butterflies. I've been wanting a spicebush as a host plant for the Spicebush Swallowtails, but didn't realize that it's a good nectar source as well. Plus, it would be good for the birds. Willow would also be on the top of my host plant list for the Tiger Swallowtails. And the list goes on.

So many wants, so little room! LOL!!
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