Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Butterflies & Moths

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-03-2017, 04:05 PM   #1
Fox
 
NEWisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
butterfly Eastern Monarch Population Numbers Drop 27%

It looks like it could be another rough year for the monarchs:
Quote:
Eastern Monarch Population Numbers Drop 27%

This year’s measurement of the eastern monarch overwintering population showed a 27% decrease compared to last year, occupying 2.91 hectares of forest in Mexico’s transvolcanic mountains during the winter of 2016-17. It is likely that an extreme and unusual winter storm contributed to this decrease. This March storm struck the overwintering colonies just as monarchs were beginning to depart on their journey north.

...

You can help by planting milkweed and nectar resources, joining a monarch citizen science project, educating your community and elected officials, or by contributing to conservation in other ways. Each of us has a role to play, but as the “T.E.A.M.” saying goes, together everyone achieves more.
Eastern Monarch Population Numbers Drop 27% | News | News & Events | The Monarch Joint Venture
__________________
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.
NEWisc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2017, 10:25 AM   #2
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

~sigh~

The first year I put in butterflyweed (A. tuberoso), I had monarch caterpillars--and several years after that. For the past few years, I haven't had any young, and only one brief sighting of an adult.

It just occurred to me that I may not have checked the lone swamp milkweed plant I have.

I now have a small stand of common milkweed (volunteers)...with more planted last year (from local seed). I am hoping to have more to attract them in the coming years.

There is a field several miles from me (along a road where I walk); it is dotted with common milkweed throughout. The problem is, it is cut probably twice a year, and the timing seems highly questionable for the survival of the chrysalises.

My hope is to create a sanctuary for them, here, that won't be cut (or at least not at the wrong time if year).
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2017, 09:53 AM   #3
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

I'm not seeing them as we used to in this area either. Not in my yard nor in the wild.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2017, 08:25 PM   #4
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
I'm not seeing them as we used to in this area either. Not in my yard nor in the wild.
I was going through my photos the other day...and I realized that I did see one newly excluded one while in a roadside walk.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2017, 08:34 PM   #5
Alternate POM Judge
 
EllenW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Maryland
Default

Fortunately I had the most monarchs ever last summer. They love tithonia. Although it is not native it is a butterfly favorite and i plant it every year. I have a large stand of common and swamp milkweed.
__________________
In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous. Aristotle
EllenW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2017, 01:18 PM   #6
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

We already have monarchs laying eggs on tiny milkweeds in central Ohio. With so many people screwing with monarchs these days, no way to tell whether the monarchs are very early or somebody local released some they raised or bought.
__________________

The caterpillar does all the work but the butterfly gets all the publicity.

George Carlin
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2017, 01:44 PM   #7
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EllenW View Post
Fortunately I had the most monarchs ever last summer. They love tithonia. Although it is not native it is a butterfly favorite and i plant it every year..
I liked the tithonia as well. Being a member of the aster family I can see why its such a butterfly magnet!
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2017, 07:38 PM   #8
Hippie Gardener
 
katjh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Michigan
Default

I saw a few more adults last year than I did in 2015, but not many. I have common milkweed, rose milkweed and butterfly weed, but I have not seen any caterpillars. Granted, I don't wade into the tall weeds to look for them - I only look around the edges, but I'm not seeing very many adults, regardless. I seem to recall seeing the adults in my yard rather late in the season, too.
__________________
One with the earth, with the sky, one with everything in life. I believe it will start with conviction of the heart.
~Kenny Loggins~
katjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2017, 07:34 AM   #9
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Would this by chance be a monarch egg?
Eastern Monarch Population Numbers Drop 27%-dscf9874.jpg
It was just a a single I had found taken last JUNE.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2017, 03:40 AM   #10
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Would this by chance be a monarch egg?
That is a lacewing egg.
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
27%, drop, eastern, monarch, numbers, population

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2