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Old 03-21-2013, 08:54 PM   #1
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Default Moth species new to science

Species New to Science: [Entomology 2005] Siamusotima aranea | Lygodium Spider Moth a New Stem-Boring Musotimine (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) from northern Thailand Feeding on Lygodium flexuosum (Schizaeaceae)

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Siamusotima aranea, is a new stem-boring musotimine species from Thailand. It was discovered in the stems of Lygodium flexuosum (L.) Sw. (Schizaeaceae) during exploration for biological control agents of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br., the Old World climbing fern. This is the first report in the Pyraloidea of a stem-boring larva with unique modifications of the anal segment resembling that of tenebrionid beetle immatures and with observations of possible mimicry between the adult moth and spiders.
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:23 PM   #2
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Here is one of the new ones that I think are cool:

Moths drink the tears of sleeping birds - life - 20 December 2006 - New Scientist
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:16 AM   #3
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Wow, very interesting moth species, KC!
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Old 03-22-2013, 08:34 AM   #4
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There are thousands of insects "discovered" every year, even where you don't expect them. When this story came out, it surprised me since you would think that an old, relatively small country like France would already have had all its insects cataloged.

Eleven new species discovered in France


Here is another story about some moths that were recently discovered. Kids love hearing about them but I wonder how many nightmares I caused. I'm always very clear that the moths are on another continent but I'm guessing someone did not sleep well.

Vampire Moth Discovered -- Evolution at Work
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:48 PM   #5
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Vampire moths are no worse than mosquitos.

In the Galapagos, one of Darwin's finch species pecks holes in the skin of the sea birds and drinks their blood. Vampire birds. Now that is just wrong.
Vampire Finches aka Sharp Beaked Finches, Sharp Billed Ground Finches When we were in Galapagos, they told us the birds also drink from seals, but the websites I lookes at don't mention this behavior.

I especially like the photo of the "spider moth".

The harder one looks at an ecosystem, the more one finds, and I think that sometimes naturalists get more excited exploring foreign places than their own backyards - thus, new species discovered in areas like France, and the fact our school kids know all about the Amazon rain forest and almost nothing about the forests in the Rockies or the Appalachians.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:44 PM   #6
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I like the freshness and activity you'all have been adding to the site!
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:29 PM   #7
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What a beautiful moth...I like the markings and immediately thought of mimicry.
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Interesting, odd, and just a little disturbing.

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In the Galapagos, one of Darwin's finch species pecks holes in the skin of the sea birds and drinks their blood. Vampire birds. Now that is just wrong.
Now that is kinda creepy.
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The harder one looks at an ecosystem, the more one finds, and I think that sometimes naturalists get more excited exploring foreign places than their own backyards - thus, new species discovered in areas like France, and the fact our school kids know all about the Amazon rain forest and almost nothing about the forests in the Rockies or the Appalachians.
You make a good point; I wish there were more exposure to our on local habitats and the local flora and fauna as well as other ecosystems around he world.
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Old 03-24-2013, 03:42 PM   #9
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The guess is that only 20% of the world's insects have been documented. Spiders are even lower. So, if you want immortalize some spider-hating friend, discover a spider and name it after him/her.

Explore: Seeking New Species
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