Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Insects, Arachnids, & Gastropods > Bug Us (help identifying bugs)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-04-2010, 08:00 PM   #1
Grub
 
TimSaupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield Township, Ohio
Default Three spiders

No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Three spiders-dsc_7607.jpgThree spiders-dsc_7603.jpgThree spiders-dsc_7611.jpg
TimSaupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 08:26 PM   #2
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSaupe View Post
No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Attachment 18751Attachment 18749Attachment 18750

No IDs sorry, not my forte'. I just wanted to say that number 1 and number 3 are excellent photos--beautiful. ...and 2nd pic is cool looking.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 08:32 PM   #3
POM Judge & Official Non Gardener
 
Sage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Default

Those shots are great for IDing!
Sage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 09:00 PM   #4
Grub
 
TimSaupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield Township, Ohio
Default

So identify them already! LOL
TimSaupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 07:12 AM   #5
The Bug Whisperer
 
suunto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Monroe County, WV, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSaupe View Post
No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Attachment 18751Attachment 18749Attachment 18750
All three are in the family Araneidae (orb-weaving spiders); the first two likely are in the genus Araneus (female and male, respectively), but their markings are not distinctive enough for a specific determination (microscopic examination/dissection often are required). The third one could be a Larinioides sp. - see Foliate spider - Larinioides cornutus photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example.

__________________
“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.”

Henry Ward Beecher
suunto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 07:16 AM   #6
Grub
 
TimSaupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield Township, Ohio
Default

Interesting insight - I thought the first and third were orb-weavers, but not the second one . . . I had thought that was something else.

Thanks for taking the time - time to start leafing through images . . .

oh and thanks for the compliment, dap.
TimSaupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2010, 11:45 AM   #7
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSaupe View Post
. . .
oh and thanks for the compliment, dap.
No problem. I really liked the impact of the images.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 12:02 PM   #8
Grub
 
TimSaupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield Township, Ohio
Default

Hey suunto -

What are the odds that the second one is a hammock spider, Pityohyphantes costatus? It seems costatus is the only one native to OH.
TimSaupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2010, 05:53 AM   #9
The Bug Whisperer
 
suunto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Monroe County, WV, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSaupe View Post
What are the odds that the second one is a hammock spider, Pityohyphantes costatus? It seems costatus is the only one native to OH.
Pretty remote - see Hammock Spider - Pityohyphantes costatus - BugGuide.Net for a male hammock spider.
__________________
“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.”

Henry Ward Beecher
suunto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2010, 07:20 PM   #10
Grub
 
TimSaupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield Township, Ohio
Default

Turns out that you were right - it is an orb weaver - specifically Araneus pegnia. ID courtesy of SpiderIdentification.org.
TimSaupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
arachnid, arachnids, araneidae, araneus, cornutus, foliate, foliate spider, insect, insects, larinioides, larinioides cornutus, orb spider, orb weaver, orb weaving spiders, orb-weaver, photos, pictures, spider id, spider identification, spider photos, spiders

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2