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TimSaupe 08-04-2010 08:00 PM

Three spiders
 
3 Attachment(s)
No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Attachment 18751Attachment 18749Attachment 18750

dapjwy 08-04-2010 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimSaupe (Post 73577)
No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Attachment 18751Attachment 18749Attachment 18750


No IDs sorry, not my forte'. I just wanted to say that number 1 and number 3 are excellent photos--beautiful. ...and 2nd pic is cool looking.

Sage 08-04-2010 08:32 PM

Those shots are great for IDing!

TimSaupe 08-04-2010 09:00 PM

So identify them already! LOL

suunto 08-05-2010 07:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimSaupe (Post 73577)
No, I have no idea as to why they are coming in threes :P Believe it or not, the majority of what I find I'm able to identify myself (over 100 species in the last two years).

Any direction and/or help appreciated. All three of these were very small and were out at night.

Attachment 18751Attachment 18749Attachment 18750

All three are in the family Araneidae (orb-weaving spiders); the first two likely are in the genus Araneus (female and male, respectively), but their markings are not distinctive enough for a specific determination (microscopic examination/dissection often are required). The third one could be a Larinioides sp. - see Foliate spider - Larinioides cornutus photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example.


TimSaupe 08-05-2010 07:16 AM

Interesting insight - I thought the first and third were orb-weavers, but not the second one . . . I had thought that was something else.

Thanks for taking the time - time to start leafing through images . . .

oh and thanks for the compliment, dap.

dapjwy 08-05-2010 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimSaupe (Post 73635)
. . .
oh and thanks for the compliment, dap.

No problem. I really liked the impact of the images.

TimSaupe 08-13-2010 12:02 PM

Hey suunto -

What are the odds that the second one is a hammock spider, Pityohyphantes costatus? It seems costatus is the only one native to OH.

suunto 08-14-2010 05:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimSaupe (Post 74513)
What are the odds that the second one is a hammock spider, Pityohyphantes costatus? It seems costatus is the only one native to OH.

Pretty remote - see Hammock Spider - Pityohyphantes costatus - BugGuide.Net for a male hammock spider.

TimSaupe 08-14-2010 07:20 PM

Turns out that you were right - it is an orb weaver - specifically Araneus pegnia. ID courtesy of SpiderIdentification.org.


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