Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Insects, Arachnids, & Gastropods > Bug Us (help identifying bugs)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-13-2010, 10:09 PM   #1
Fox
 
Bulucanagria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S. Grafton, Massachusetts
Default OK, I lied

I haven't submitted anything to bugguide yet. So here are five more. The first four are all from a patch of thistle in northern MA and the last isn't. (It's from central MA).
OK, I lied-bug.jpgOK, I lied-bugg.jpgOK, I lied-buggg.jpgOK, I lied-bugggg.jpgOK, I lied-buggggggg.jpg
__________________
BULUCANAGRIA'S FLICKR
Bulucanagria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 06:37 AM   #2
WG Contest Coordinator
 
tineckbone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Browns Mills, NJ
Default

I think that number 3 is a harvestman and that number 5 is a theridion frondeum, a cobweb spider.
__________________
I am a long haired, tree hugging, dirt worshiping environmentalist.
tineckbone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 08:42 AM   #3
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

I think #2 is Metriorhynchomiris dislocatus, a plant bug. If it is, it's native and feeds primarily on wild geraniums.
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 08:50 AM   #4
The Bug Whisperer
 
suunto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Monroe County, WV, USA
Default

The first one is a four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapsus lineatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Miridae)- see http://www.ppdl.purdue.edu/PPDL/imag...bug-plant.jpeg for an image; the second one might be a soldier beetle (Coleoptera: Cantharidae) - see http://www.entomart.be/nouveaux/NEO-0095-Cantharisl.jpg for an example; number three indeed is an opilionid, commonly known as harvestmen or daddy long-legs, likely in the family Sclerosomatidae - see Palpatores - Sclerosomatidae photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example; number four is a nymph of a grasshopper in the family Acrididae, but I have no idea which species; the fifth one is a cobweb spider (family Theridiidae),and it could be Theridion frondeum (albeit a very pale example), but I would hesitate to be absolutely certain. This species, like many others, can be highly variable in appearance - see Species Theridion frondeum - BugGuide.Net for some examples.
__________________
“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.”

Henry Ward Beecher
suunto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 07:00 PM   #5
Butterfly Educator Extraordinaire
 
bridget1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ventnor City, New Jersey, USA
Default

Suunto: I am very impressed with your insect ID skills! Are you an entomologist?
__________________
"Just living is not enough," said the butterfly, "one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower." ~Hans Christian Anderson

http://mslenahan.edublogs.org/
bridget1964 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 07:36 AM   #6
The Bug Whisperer
 
suunto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Monroe County, WV, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bridget1964 View Post
Suunto: I am very impressed with your insect ID skills! Are you an entomologist?
Yes; retired, but still learning - so many insects; so little time...
__________________
“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.”

Henry Ward Beecher
suunto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 05:44 PM   #7
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Great to have someone like him-you in the sight.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 09:20 PM   #8
Fox
 
Bulucanagria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S. Grafton, Massachusetts
Default

Thank you, suunto. I guess I should have recognized the Harvestman but the setting seemed different. I guess I'm used to seeing them on home foundations and such.
I really enjoy taking pictures of insects as I find them to be quite beautiful. Even the nominally ugly ones are beautiful in a utilitarian way. Thanks for putting a name to them for me.
__________________
BULUCANAGRIA'S FLICKR
Bulucanagria is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
lied

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2