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Old 06-12-2010, 05:10 PM   #1
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Default A fly? on a flower

Or is it a bee? I'll take any info you care to offer. I have a lot of bugs to ID and I'm gonna split them up between here and Bugguide.net. I don't want to overwhelm either site.
A fly? on a flower-fly.jpgA fly? on a flower-flyy.jpgA fly? on a flower-flyyy.jpg
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Old 06-12-2010, 08:29 PM   #2
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I'm thinking...maybe a wasp?
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Old 06-13-2010, 05:41 AM   #3
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This is one of the so-called 'sweat bees' in the family Halictidae; likely in the genus Agapostemon - see Agapostemon virescens (female) photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example.
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Old 06-13-2010, 06:28 AM   #4
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Thanks again, suunto. You're a wealth of information.
Dan
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Old 06-13-2010, 11:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
Or is it a bee? I'll take any info you care to offer. I have a lot of bugs to ID and I'm gonna split them up between here and Bugguide.net. I don't want to overwhelm either site.
Attachment 17319Attachment 17320Attachment 17321

What a beautiful iridescent green color!
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Old 06-13-2010, 12:08 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
What a beautiful iridescent green color!
With all apologies to plants and trees, the most beautiful greens in nature seem to occur on bugs, especially bees and wasps such as this Augochlora pura female.
A fly? on a flower-augochlora-pura-female.jpg
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Old 06-14-2010, 07:22 PM   #7
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Bee-u-tiful bees, Dan! Great photos; so clear and crisp!

Suunto: isn't one way to tell the difference between bees and flies the way their wings are positioned on their bodies?
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Old 06-15-2010, 07:31 AM   #8
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Suunto: isn't one way to tell the difference between bees and flies the way their wings are positioned on their bodies?
Not necessarily, as both can be found with their wings neatly folded over their back. The most reliable separation is that all bees and winged wasps (there are some wingless species) have four wings whereas all true flies (order Diptera) have but two wings. Some confusion may occur in that some insects in other orders have the word 'fly' in their common names (e.g.: dragonfly, damselfly, dobsonfly, scorpionfly, etc.). Also, all bees and wasps have chewing mouthparts as adults; all true flies have either sponging (like house flies) or piercing-sucking/stabbing (blood feeders and predatory species) mouthparts.
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