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Old 07-29-2016, 09:46 PM   #11
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Found enjoying itself on purple coneflower and rudbeckia this morning--greener than any bee I have ever seen. Is this a bee mimic of some kind?
Handsome little fella! We have them here and they seem to adore purple prairie clover, when it's in bloom.
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Old 07-29-2016, 10:47 PM   #12
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I have them in my garden, but have never noticed the stinging or biting. There are so many kinds of native bees that you never see unless you really look closely.
This is my experience too. And certain plants seem to be particular favorites. From my gardens, mountain mint has been a big hit, also tall rattlesnake root, summersweet, virginia sweetspire and black snakeroot. But sweat bees seem to be generalists and visit many kinds of accessible blooms. And they seem, as much as any pollinator, to really appreciate late season pollen sources, like the rattlesnake root, asters, goldenrod, etc.
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Old 08-01-2016, 08:35 AM   #13
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Sweat bees are really pretty. They really like my woodson milkweed flowers
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Old 08-02-2016, 06:07 AM   #14
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Now that I am looking for them, I am finding them on most of our pollinator plants. We also have quite a few of the Great Black Wasp this year, about which I have learned an interesting tidbit of information. Like some other wasps, they paralyze prey for their larvae, but house sparrows and catbirds sometimes make off with the prey before the wasp can get it to her nest. Given that we seem to have plenty of all of the above in our little corner of the world, we seem to have quite the food web going on.
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Old 08-02-2016, 06:32 AM   #15
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Often along with sweat bees, one may see small wasps and hover (tachinid) flies.
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Old 08-02-2016, 07:16 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
Now that I am looking for them, I am finding them on most of our pollinator plants. We also have quite a few of the Great Black Wasp this year, about which I have learned an interesting tidbit of information. Like some other wasps, they paralyze prey for their larvae, but house sparrows and catbirds sometimes make off with the prey before the wasp can get it to her nest. Given that we seem to have plenty of all of the above in our little corner of the world, we seem to have quite the food web going on.
I enjoy seeing a variety of wasps...but it is disturbing to think of the fate of the paralyzed larvae.

Congratulations on your complex food web.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:58 PM   #17
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Great black wasps particularly like my hoary mountain mint. When it starts to bloom I can count on seeing a handful of them at any time I look. I have noticed that particular wasps and bees favor specific species of flower very consistently.
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Old 08-20-2016, 08:27 PM   #18
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I have noticed that particular wasps and bees favor specific species of flower very consistently.
That is another reason that I love welcoming nature to our yards; we can notice patterns and behaviors that we'd never know about only seeing a species in passing.
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