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Old 12-29-2015, 10:20 PM   #41
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I spotted this little guy the yesterday...not sure if he originated in my yard or came in with the bags of leaves I'd been bringing home. Although the leaves have been spread, the caterpillar was found where I'd been storing the bagged leaves.



Any idea what species it is?

Thank you.
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Old 12-29-2015, 11:54 PM   #42
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Looks like a green cutworm.
Olive Green Cutworm (Dargida procincta) - Dargida procinctus - BugGuide.Net
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Old 12-30-2015, 12:18 AM   #43
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Thanks, Gloria. That does look like it.

I was trying to figure out if it was a native insect or not...found this farther down on the page: "Does not occur in eastern North America.". Does that mean it is not native to my area?...it seems to be occurring here (or a strong look-alike).

I remember my dad talking about cutworms that attacked young vegetable seedlings in the garden, if I recall. I'm not looking forward to any problems with our garden...but if it is a native insect I'm fine with letting them be--cabbage moths on the other hand, I know are not natives...I'd like to get rid of them--when I find their larvae, I feed them to my frogs.
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Old 12-30-2015, 02:14 AM   #44
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This might be more likely for your area. An introduced species of cutworm that is brighter green in the early stage.

Noctua pronuba
Large Yellow Underwing? - Noctua pronuba - BugGuide.Net

http://somethingscrawlinginmyhair.co...2/09/cutworms/

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As near as I can find out, these are two different species of cutworm. The green one was tenatively identified by the folks at bug guide as being maybe Noctua pronuba, which has characteristic black dashes along its back. It turns out that this caterpillar changes color as it grows, with the young ones being grass-green, while the ones that are old enough to pupate on their next molt are more brown. As is all too common, this species was accidentally introduced from Europe, and has become very common in North America.
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The second one (cutworm) is kind of lacking in diagnostic features, and it’s hard to pin it down any more narrowly than to say it is probably one of the more nondescript types of Owlet Moths, family Noctuidae. It turns out that while some of the moths in this family have very distinctive caterpillars, a lot more just have caterpillars that are these unexceptional greyish-brown eating machines, like this one. Even so, it probably could be identified by someone who was sufficiently expert.
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:06 AM   #45
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Quote:
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This might be more likely for your area. An introduced species of cutworm that is brighter green in the early stage.

Noctua pronuba
Large Yellow Underwing? - Noctua pronuba - BugGuide.Net

Cutworms | The Backyard Arthropod Project
Thanks, Gloria, for posting two more possibilities.

I'm much better at identifying plants than insects...and I'm not sure how limited my skills are in the flora department...I just know they are scant in the fauna department.

The first one you suggested still seems to be an exact match (to my untrained eye) just looking at the color and pattern and no other identifying characteristics. Isn't it just as likely that a North American species can be introduced outside its range as it is for alien species to come from other countries?

I hate to kill anything (and doubt I would necessarily find it again)...but it might be just a little easier if I knew it was an introduced garden pest. Until I know for sure, it is easier for me to live and let live.

Hmm...now that I think of it, I took a photo of another, brown caterpillar that I found clinging to the inside of one of the leaf bags. It occurred to me that I may be introducing pests from other people's yards...however, I recall thinking I had seen the same caterpillar already on our property weeks before. Also, I am not so far say geographically from where I am picking up the leaves, so I concluded that any pest that is there is likely already here.
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:02 AM   #46
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Whatzit?
Is There an Entomologist in the House?-dsc_2752.jpg

Is There an Entomologist in the House?-dsc_2754.jpg

It has tiny winglike pods upon its side
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:58 AM   #47
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Bot fly?
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Old 08-31-2017, 11:06 AM   #48
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Never saw any with wings like that. It was much bigger than what we call bot flies. Almost horsefly like but it did not have the checkered like eyes
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Old 08-31-2017, 03:12 PM   #49
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Like this one maybe? Bot Fly - Cuterebra fontinella - BugGuide.Net

I have never seen a bot fly personally.
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Old 08-31-2017, 04:00 PM   #50
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YES! Guess what we call bot flies here are anything that lays eggs upon a carcass. That route leas to some interesting facts...

You can tell male female by the spacing between the eyes, as well as rump. Be careful handling females as they can pump out a thousand eggs, and you don't want to accidentally ingest one. This bot seems to be able to survive for a while in the wrong hosts, ie cats, dogs, people, Hope it wasn't a female as I pulled it from a spiders web! NORMALLY I let nature take it's course but the grandson was pleading with me to set it free when it entangled itself!

Good to know,,,,,,,,,, Any future weight gain will be pinned on him!
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