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Old 07-29-2014, 09:15 PM   #1
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Default Clearwing Hummingbird Moths

Anyone know what species these are? Sorry for the out of focus.

Clearwing Hummingbird Moths-clearwing-moth.jpg
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth Hemaris thysbe

Clearwing Hummingbird Moths-clearwing-moths.jpg
Snowberry Clearwing Moth Hemaris diffinis
Hummingbird Clearwing Moth Hemaris thysbe
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Old 07-29-2014, 09:26 PM   #2
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Probably Snowberry clearwing, Hemaris diffinis Species Hemaris diffinis - Snowberry Clearwing - Hodges#7855 - BugGuide.Net

but could be Hemaris thysbe, hummingbird clearwing
Species Hemaris thysbe - Hummingbird Clearwing - Hodges#7853 - BugGuide.Net

They don't sit still very well to be photographed. I have both on my property. The caterpillars are easier to tell apart.
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Old 07-29-2014, 10:30 PM   #3
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I just saw my first one for this year...it was finding shelter under a leaf, not on a flower which would've made a better picture.

turttle, your comment about the caterpillars made me wonder about their host plant. After doing a search, it seems black cherry is the most likely host plant I have for them...although dogbane and honeysuckle are also on the list, I've only added these recently and they are still small.
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:59 AM   #4
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Thanks turttle! I was scrambling to focus on the flowers since they were easier to set, but I was slightly off for every photo. Tripod and patience might prove easier.
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Old 07-30-2014, 01:20 PM   #5
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I find the caterpillars on my honeysuckle, both native and fragrantissima, and on all of my viburnums. That is how the two species segregate in my yard. My Lonicera sempriverans (not sure if I spelled that right) gets stripped by late summer, probably why it hasn't ever grown very well.
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Old 08-02-2014, 01:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
I find the caterpillars on my honeysuckle, both native and fragrantissima, and on all of my viburnums.
It sounds like they have a couple host plants.

Good to know. I've added some viburnums--and I want to add more. They are all still very small. I also, have a L. sempriverans (sp.?)--but it is in my pot ghetto still.

Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
My Lonicera sempriverans (not sure if I spelled that right) gets stripped by late summer, probably why it hasn't ever grown very well.
At least it is going to a good cause.
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Old 08-02-2014, 07:36 PM   #7
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The larvae feed on plants including honeysuckle, viburnum, hawthorn, snowberry, cherry, and plum.
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